theories of aging


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Related to theories of aging: social theories of aging

theories of aging

theories proposed to explain aging and death of cells and organisms. They are generally divided into two major groupings. The first group consists of programmed causes, with timed functional changes, and is generally based on genetic theories; this group includes programmed senescence of cells, shortening of telomeres, and declines in hormonal or in immunological function. The second group, called stochastic theories, consists of theories based on random events occurring over time and includes free radical generation, gradual wear and tear, mutation over time, and differences in metabolic rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biological decline appears to be part of the aging process; however, each individual's rate of decline, based on factors identified in current biological theories of aging, impacts the individual aging process.
Generally, two perspectives exist regarding the biological theories of aging (Sozou & Kinkwood, 2001).
Using biological theories of aging, the nurse can assist the person in better management of nutrition, incontinence, sleep rhythms, immunological response, catecholamine surges, hormonal and electrolyte balance, and drug efficacy of older adults with chronic illnesses.
1984; Partridge and Fowler 1992), to find experimental support for these evolutionary theories of aging.
presents an overview of gerontological counseling for practitioners and continuing students, outlining major theories of aging, basic practical skill sets involved, and the psychodynamic and existential issues involved in working with older patients.
Plus, their function (and dysfunction) serves as the backbone for one of the major theories of aging.
Aging and the Aged: Theories of Aging and Life Extension," Encyclopedia of Bioethics, New York: MacMillan, 1993.
Important aspects of the evolutionary theories of aging have been supported by mathematical analysis (Williams 1957; Hamilton 1966; Charlesworth 1980; Kirkwood 1987).
in The Elements of Nursing (1980), they cover theories of aging, and assessment of body systems and functions including sexuality.
Following the keynote address on current theories of aging and issues of extended longevity, ten papers treat trends relating to analysis of polyphenols, bioavailability, and metabolism; and research on the roles of phytochemicals in brain and other vital functions in healthy aging, chronic disease, and disease prevention.
Also covered are biological theories of aging, complementary and alternative medicine, and Medicare and Medicaid.