slip

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slip

(slip)
1. To move out of a customary place; to dislocate (e.g., an intervertebral disk).
2. To slide into or on top of.
References in periodicals archive ?
A coating to the tongue "A THICK coating is often considered reflective of poor gut health," says Dr Okoye, and while a thin coating is normal, it shouldn't be non-existent.
"It's important to brush the tongue when brushing your teeth, because most bacterial growth in a person's mouth is at the back of the tongue."
In reality, we taste different flavours using taste buds spread across all parts of the tongue.
Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue has a poor prognosis due to its aggressive behaviour and tendency to metastasize in the lymph nodes which accounts for 15-75%.4 many studies reported that advanced stage carcinoma of tongue has poor prognosis5.
They also stripped the tongue. This resulted in infection of oral cavity.
The tongue is ideally located to perform those orofacial functions, that is, it is located at the entrance to the gastrointestinal system and the respiratory system.
They begin by examining the importance of the tongue in dentistry, the anatomy and morphology of the tongue, the normal variations among tongues, and the diagnosis of changes to the tongue.
According to the Daily Mai l, one of his friends can be seen trying to release the clutch of the animal from the tongue by force, while trying not to hurt the tongue already gripped by the crab.
The findings come from a large, population-based study that identified variations in the tongue microbiota among community-dwelling elderly adults in Japan.
Ankyloglossia or tongue tie is a condition in which the tip of the tongue cannot be protruded beyond the lower incisor teeth because of short frenulumA1.
Researchers made the discovery by comparing the hyoid bones - the bones that support and ground the tongue - of modern birds and crocodiles with those of their extinct dinosaur relatives.
The skinks, which are found across Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, are camouflaged, thus the use of the tongue adds as a last survival attempt.