Ockham's razor

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The simplest expression of scientific truth; where 2 theories exist to explain a similar phenomenon, the one making the fewest assumptions should prevail—i.e., it should be no more complicated than necessary. In keeping with Occam’s razor, generalisations should be based on observed facts and not on other generalisations
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Ockham's razor

See OCCAM'S RAZOR.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Ockham's razor

or

Occam's razor

the principle which states that when a selection has to be made from various hypotheses, it is best to start with the hypothesis that makes fewest assumptions. It is named after William of Ockham (d. c .1349).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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The principle of economy that emerged from the views of William of Occam, namely that where alternative hypotheses exist, the one involving the fewest assumptions is to be preferred, is still valid in science.