reconstruction

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reconstruction

 [re″kon-struk´shun]
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part, such as with a bypass or plastic surgery.
aortic reconstruction restoration of function to a damaged aorta, as by bypass or aortoplasty.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn),
The computerized synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in computed tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is two-dimensional Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

/re·con·struc·tion/ (-kon-struk´shun)
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part.

reconstruction

An eClinical trial term of art for archival trial records that should support the data as well as the processes used for obtaining and managing the data, such that the trustworthiness of results obtained can be evaluated. Reconstruction from records should confirm the validity of the information system and its conformance to applicable regulations during design and execution of the trial, as well as during the period of record retention.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn)
The computed synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is 2-D Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

to reassemble or re-form from constituent parts, such as the mathematical process by which an image is assembled from a series of projections in computed tomography.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking on the occasion, DG PaRRSA, Mohammad Tahir Orakzai said that the agency is providing financial assistance for the reconstruction of 117 schools damaged during militancy and 5 schools damaged during Flood 2010 in Malakand Division.
Muhammad Tahir Orakzai informed the USAID delegation, USAID is providing financial assistance for the reconstruction of 117 schools damaged during militancy and 5 schools damaged during Flood 2010 in Malakand Division.
The administration plans to pass legislation to establish it within one year after the reconstruction law goes into effect.
Another important aspect to address during the pre-operative period is the patient's expectations of the reconstruction.
The Reconstruction Acts, also known as the Military Reconstruction Acts, provided no date of termination for Federal military rule in the South.
To accomplish this part of the reconstruction without disrupting rail schedules, the two new, longer bridges were constructed on temporary pipe piles that supported the roll-in rail mechanism.
The overhaul will necessitate the complete closure of the building in 2006; the reconstruction is expected to continue at least until 2008, with the theater open part-time.
The probability of encountering necrosis of the reconstruction materials when using a graft without a vascular pedicle is higher, and the superiority of flaps over grafts in the reconstruction process of stenosis is well established.
The recently launched Iraq Reconstruction Report will cover the reconstruction business opportunities in that country, "keeping you abreast of potential opportunities with up-to-the-minute developments and trends, as well as provide you with in-depth analysis of the developing legal and regulatory structure and business practices within this new environment.
Reconstruction takes longer to complete the larger the data stripe size and/or the higher the drive capacity; moreover, during the reconstruction period, the array group will exhibit a significant decrease in performance.
This was followed by the Reconstruction Act of 1867, which divided the former Confederate states--with the exception of Tennessee--into five military districts and set out a program to reconstitute state governments and provide for universal manhood suffrage, while stopping short of any redistribution of land or wealth to former slaves.
Instead, these discourses tended to obscure a pervasive practice of subjection and, in so doing, paved the way for other newly emerging encroachments of power during the Reconstruction era and the Gilded Age.