thanatos


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than·a·tos

(than'ă-tos),
In psychoanalysis, the death principle, representing all instinctual tendencies toward senescence and death. See also entries under instinct Compare: eros.
[G. death]

Thanatos

[than′ətəs]
Etymology: Gk, death
a freudian term for the death instinct.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, for other commentators, the circulation of various frames available to read the photograph presented a paradoxical perspective on the distinctions between eros and thanatos.
In Antichrist however, her son's fall from the window ushers She into the maw of reality without fantasy, where all that was repressed returns in a uncanny explosion of eros and thanatos.
Finalmente, en la tercera etapa, Freud termina por equiparar directamente las fuerzas destructivas con la sexualidad, que llamara, como sabemos, Thanatos, o principio de muerte, tambien conocido como principio de nirvana, en la medida en que su finalidad es el mantenimiento de la tranquilidad del yo frente a excitaciones.
Masked: Heroes Nyx and Thanatos Superzeroes: Self-styled comic crime fighters
The modern skyscraper tower thus offers a combination of eros and thanatos, with base commercial motives thrown liberally into the mix.
Thus, he sums up the fecundity of postwar Californians with a couplet: "Eros vanquished Thanatos.
orthos, recto, -derecho, correcto-; thanatos, muerte), o muerte correcta, precisa no alargar la vida por mecanismos artificiales.
Premature death can be the price of sleep deprivation (fitting perhaps, since the god of death, Thanatos, was twin brother to Hypnos).
The term euthanasia is derived from two Greek words--eu, which means good, and thanatos, which means death.
The second group of photos is the dossier "Eros + Thanatos," which deals with the assassination of individuals during the violence.
The exhibition invites the visitor, under the cover of darkness, to wander through the labyrinth, perhaps ruminating on the two main foci within which it unfolds: Eros and Thanatos, eroticism and death.
Desmond begins by concisely but carefully elucidating such correspondences and divergences in the thought of Percy and Peirce--and places both in dialogue with George Steiner's Real Presences (1989) and Grammars of Creation (2002), a dialogue developed further in Desmond's reading of The Thanatos Syndrome (1987) in particular.