thanatology

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thanatology

 [than″ah-tol´ah-je]
the medicolegal study of death and conditions affecting dead bodies.

than·a·tol·o·gy

(than'ă-tol'ŏ-jē),
The branch of science concerned with the study of death and dying.
[thanato- + G. logos, study]

thanatology

(thăn′ə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of death and dying, especially in their psychological and social aspects.

than′a·to·log′i·cal (-tl-ŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
than′a·tol′o·gist n.

thanatology

[than′ətol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, thanatos, death, logos, science
the study of death and dying. thanatologist, n.

than·a·tol·o·gy

(than'ă-tol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of science concerned with the study of death and dying.
[thanato- + G. logos, study]

thanatology

1. The study of death.
2. The forensic study of the causes of death and their relation to postmortem appearances.

Thanatology

The medical, psychological, or legal study of death and dying.
Mentioned in: Bereavement

thanatology

the medicolegal study of death and conditions affecting human bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The originality of Philip Roth's reflection on thanatological objectification thus resides in his novel's resistance to the Manichaean explanations of traditional victim-perpetrator schemes.
This is why his unlikely combination of Sadean, American, and Jewish ideological gestures ultimately demonstrates the inevitability of thanatological fetishization.
The root of ideological violence, understood in this manner, seems to lie in the denial of thanatological failure.
Both, in fact, have to be seen as thanatological projects of salvation and are, as such, equally subject to the charge of violent repressiveness.
According to Roth's novel, then, mutual victimization is inherent in any contest of thanatological systems of salvation.
Reading only the masterful violence that must attend any thanatological effort to make sense and not the mortal pain that no authoritarian representation will ever be able to exorcise, feminist thanatology indeed seems to take "male" subjectivity at its word, claiming the success of a mastery that the conquering subject frequently enough cannot bring himself to believe in.
The conclusion that Roth's novel draws from this situation of reciprocal enthrallment is a bleak one: while Sabbath and Drenka's narcissistic pornutopia still seemed to promise a possible equilibrium in the male and female subject's desire to find thanatological Aufhebung in their respective counterpart, the necessary failure of any such fetishization of transient objects transforms the interaction of mortal selves, seeking salvation in each other, into an endless chain reaction of mutual violence.
Thus, on rare occasions, Sabbath seems to notice the resemblance between other people's thanatological homes and his own subversive pursuit of ecstasy.
In thanatological literature the term "pornography of death" appears which refers to the treatment of death in terms of a social "taboo".
In science, "the conspiracy of silence" about death was broken long ago, which is evidenced by an abundance of thanatological publications that analyze death from various perspectives, both research and theoretical ones.
This is what makes the idea of a hospice a highly regarded model of care of the dying persons, both in thanatological literature and in medical sociology itself [34-39].