thallus


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Related to thallus: Thales

thallus

 [thal´us]
1. a simple plant body not differentiated into root, stem, and leaf, characteristic of mycelial fungi and some algae.
2. the actively growing vegetative organism as distinguished from reproductive or resting portions, as in fungi.

thal·lus

(thal'ŭs),
A simple plant or fungus body that is devoid of roots, stems, and leaves. The vegetative growth of a fungus.
[G. thallos, a young shoot]

thallus

(thăl′əs)
n. pl. thalli (thăl′ī) or thal·luses
1. A plant body undifferentiated into stem, root, or leaf.
2. The main body of an alga, fungus, or lichen.

thal·lus

(thal'ŭs)
A simple plant or fungus body that is devoid of roots, stems, and leaves. The vegetative growth of a fungus.
[G. thallos, a young shoot]
References in periodicals archive ?
Trouble with lichen: the re-evaluation and re-interpretation of thallus form and fruit body types in the molecular era.
The illustrations of the thallus structures of the ten lichen species from Parmeliaceae family investigated in the present study are shown in Figure 1.
Parmotrema screminiae (Figure 1) has a sorediate, saxicolous thallus and eciliate lobes.
The sporophyte is a multicellular thallus typically consisting of internal (i.e.
They are usually prostrate, with a dorsiventral thallus, 20-50 x 0.80-1.20 mm, without hairs; section of thallus shows the lamina and the border unistratose throughout; border cells have thickened walls, clearly distinct from the rest of the lamina, and single spines, 15-35 [micron]m long; the spines are sparsely distributed along the marginal cells.
Taxonomic features used for identification included type of cell connections (fusions and secondary pits), thallus organization, presence/absence and position of mega cells (trichocytes), and characteristics of the reproductive structures (conceptacles) (Appendix Table A1; Appendix Figs.
Even if upper parts of the thallus are under oversaturated light conditions, the productivity of the rest of the algal thallus compensates for this reduced photosynthetic production (Sand-Jensen et al., 2007).
Collections and observations were often made at marked locations or along semi-permanent transect lines, which allowed us to note species occurrence, reproductive periodicity, and in some instances, seasonal thallus growth.
Their equisetum-like body called "thallus" forms neither tissues nor typical organs, such as stems, leaves, roots, or flowers.