tetraploid

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tetraploid

 [tet´rah-ploid]
1. characterized by tetraploidy.
2. an individual or cell having four sets of chromosomes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pol·y·ploi·dy

(pol'ē-ploy'dē),
The state of a cell nucleus containing three or more haploid sets. Cells containing three, four, five, or six multiples are referred to, respectively, as triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, or hexaploid.
[poly- + G. ploidēs, in form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tetraploid

(tĕt′rə-ploid′)
adj.
Having four times the haploid number of chromosomes in the cell nucleus: a tetraploid species.
n.
A tetraploid individual.

tet′ra·ploi′dy n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tetraploid

Referring to a polyploid organism with four (4X) sets of chromosomes derived from two different parental species, resulting in an allopolyploid organism.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pol·y·ploi·dy

(pol'ē-ploy'dē)
The state of a cell nucleus containing three or more haploid sets. Cells containing three, four, five, or six multiples are referred to, respectively, as triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, and hexaploid.
[poly- + G. ploidēs, in form]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tetraploid

  1. having four times the HAPLOID (1) number of chromosomes in the nucleus.
  2. an individual with four sets of chromosomes per cell. see TRIPLOID.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, six of 26 total metaphase cells (23.1%) and six of the 16 abnormal ones (37.5%) were tetraploidies. It is important to note that this abnormality appears in the early malignant transformation (32, 47, 50) and it is common in precancerous and cancerous stages of some types of tissues (45) as the ovarian surface epithelium (6,46), where its presence is significantly correlated with an increased risk of tumor progression (47-50).