testimony


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testimony

[tes′timō′nē]
Etymology: L, testimonium, evidence
the statement of a witness, usually made orally and given under oath, such as at a court trial.
References in periodicals archive ?
A brief epilogue reflects on the paradigmatic status that Holocaust testimony has achieved for efforts to document genocides after the Shoah.
Each testimony is presented clearly with the video testimony central in the page.
The legal side of testimony: The legal basis for requiring a witness to perform testimony is the Bahraini Procedures Act, Article 114 to Article 127, where the legislator has strengthened such commitment with a criminal penalty in case of violation, which may reach jail term of 3 months if the issue is a non-compliance with the orders of the investigating and trial authorities.
ISSUE: Expert witnesses are often called upon in medical negligence cases to provide testimony as to a defendant-physician's breach of the standard of care, and the WVSMA believes that all expert witness testimony should be fair and accurate.
Walter Quijano told jurors that the fact Buck is black meant he was more likely to be violent in the future, he ought to be granted a new trial without race-related testimony.
In contrast, frequent is the motion hearing, violation of probation hearing, or sentencing in which the trial judge orders a copy of the hearing transcript in order to review testimony or to insert in an order the exact language used by a witness.
9) The government did not complete the examination, and ordered the appellant to return to complete his testimony.
We identified a total of eight errors in GAO's fiscal year 2008 testimony performance data.
The testimony smacks of prostitution and illicit behavior and -- although no evidence remotely indicates that Mr.
The defense also wanted to introduce the testimony of the defendant's mother and a former roommate to establish that he began hearing voices before he became a heavy user of cocaine.
About 200 years ago, coerced testimony was recognized as useless for arriving at truth in a court of law.
In its Motion in Limine, Enforcement Counsel argued that Peyrelevade should not be considered "unavailable" under the Board's Rules of Practice ("the Rules") merely because he was residing overseas, given that he would be using the deposition testimony to substitute for live testimony in order to avoid arrest for the pending criminal indictment in California, and that in-person testimony is necessary to enable the ALJ to properly assess Peyrelevade's credibility.