amine

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Related to tertiary amines: arylamine

amine

 [am´in, ah´mēn]
an organic compound containing nitrogen.
biogenic amine bioamine.
sympathomimetic a's amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, the group includes the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.
vasoactive a's amines that cause vasodilation and increase small vessel permeability, such as histamine and serotonin.

a·mine

, primary aminesecondary aminetertiary aminequaternary ammonium ion (ă-mēn', am'in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine; that of two atoms, a secondary amine; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

(ah-mēn´) (am´in) an organic compound containing nitrogen; any of a group of compounds formed from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms by organic radicals.
biogenic amine  a type of amine synthesized by plants and animals and frequently involved in signaling, e.g., neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin; others are hormones or components of vitamins, phospholipids, bacteria, or ribosomes, e.g., cadaverine, choline, histamine, and spermine.
sympathomimetic amines  amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, comprising the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.

amine

[am′in, əmēn′]
Etymology: L, ammonia
(in chemistry) an organic derivative of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn')
A substance derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine, e.g., NH2CH3; that of two atoms, a secondary amine, e.g., NH(CH3)2; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine, e.g., N(CH3)3; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, e.g., +N(CH3)4, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

A class of organic compounds derived from ammonia by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms by a member of the paraffin series or by an aromatic group. Amines occur widely in the body, and many drugs are amines.

amine

an organic base formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms of ammonia by organic groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn') Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable as shown here.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals.

amine

an organic compound containing nitrogen.

biogenic a's
amine neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine.
direct-acting sympathomimetic a's
activate adrenergic effector cells, e.g. catecholamine, directly and do not need adrenergic nerves to exert their effects.
amine hormones
enteroendocrine cells, distributed widely in the gastric, intestinal and pancreatic tissue, synthesize peptide and amine hormones that control the secretion of digestive juices. See also apud cells.
amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation cells
toxic a's
occur in plants, e.g. cyclopamine, tyramine.
vasoactive amine
amine that causes vasodilatation and increases small vessel permeability, e.g. histamine and serotonin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Camphorquinone is an example of a photoinitiator that requires a co-initiator such as a tertiary amine for an efficient polymerization process to occur.
DMDEE high-boiling tertiary amine with a balanced reactivity to blowing and gelation reactions.
The resonance stabilization of the positive charge (partially shared by both nitrogen atoms) after the initiation step and the fact that that there is not a mobile positive counterion in close vicinity to the alkoxide group, as in the case of the initiation by typical tertiary amines, can explain the high value of the propagation rate.
The major demethylation pathways of the tertiary amines, imipramine and presumably amitriptyline, are catalyzed by P4501A and P4503A isoenzyme systems (103).
The cause for the poor corrosion resistance imparted by p-NMAz is most likely the result of the hydrophobic nature of the tertiary amines in the repeat unit structure.
Prices for all other ADMA(R) and DAMA(R) tertiary amines cuts and packages will increase 40 cents per pound in North America, also effective January 1, 2006, or as contracts allow.
Types of catalysts discussed included tertiary amines, organo metallics, and metal carboxylates.
Neither primary nor tertiary amines form stable nitrosamines so they are generally considered to be "safe" materials.
In addition, unlike other compounds in its class that are tertiary amines, trospium is a quartenary amine and therefore does not appear to cross the blood-brain barrier," said Dr.
Manufacturing capability in Asia, Europe, and North America is used to produce our full range of products, which includes fatty alcohols, fatty acids, methyl esters, glycerine, tertiary amines, and food ingredients such as SEFOSE[TM] and OLEAN[R].
New Dabco NE 1070 and NE 300 catalysts are alternatives to commonly used tertiary amines, many of which can volatize under certain conditions.