territoriality


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ter·ri·to·ri·al·i·ty

(ter'i-tō'rē-al'i-tē),
1. The tendency of individuals or groups to defend a particular domain or sphere of interest or influence.
2. The tendency of an individual animal to define a finite space as its own habitat from which it will fight off trespassing animals of its own species.
The relatively stationary zones and invisible boundaries that regulate interaction

ter·ri·to·ri·al·i·ty

(ter'i-tōr'ē-al'i-tē)
1. The tendency of individuals or groups of people to defend a particular domain or sphere of interest or influence.
2. The tendency of an individual animal to define a finite space as its own habitat from which it will fight off trespassing animals of its own species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Novak P, 2011, "The flexible territoriality of borders" Geopolitics 16 741-767
It follows that in cases such as Kiobel, thinking about the ATS scope of application in terms of political recognition invites us to abandon the territoriality principle and to adopt the universal jurisdiction principle.
"Territoriality," which is the most pervasive and least controversial principle of prescriptive jurisdiction under international law, confers jurisdiction based on the "locus" of the crime.
These include lack of breeding territoriality in males, small size, and (perhaps as a developmental correlate) absence of pelvic fins.
Both Newman and Katyal note the relationship between territoriality and surveillance.
(9) Unlike Ptolemaic astronomy, which purports "to save the appearances" by grafting epicycle onto epicycle, Professor Domingo demonstrates that his global law is a whole that affects all of its constituent parts--namely, the concepts of territoriality, state, sovereignty, and person.
With the method used here, we were able to demonstrate the territoriality of the Little Blue Heron without having to mark individual birds, and from a very close distance to the feeding site and the birds.
It also proposes two cross-cutting "beams" - governance and territoriality.
Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) 101 applies to both new and existing schools and is built on three simple concepts: natural surveillance, natural access control, and territoriality. If a school's layout seems unsafe, adopting a few CPTED fundamentals may help make it significantly safer.