background radiation

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back·ground ra·di·a·tion

irradiation from environmental sources, including the earth's crust, the atmosphere, cosmic rays, and ingested radionuclides.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

background radiation

The amount of ionising (electromagnetic) radiation to which a person is exposed from natural sources, including terrestrial radiation due to natural radionuclides in the soil (e.g., radon), cosmic radiation and fallout in the environment from anthropogenic sources.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

background radiation

Radiation The amount of ionizing-electromagnetic radiation to which a person is exposed from natural sources including terrestrial radiation due to natural radionuclides in the soil–eg, radon, cosmic radiation, and fallout in the environment from anthropogenic sources. See Radon.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

back·ground ra·di·a·tion

(bak'grownd rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Irradiation from environmental sources, including the earth's crust, the atmosphere, cosmic rays, and ingested radionuclides in the body.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

back·ground ra·di·a·tion

(bak'grownd rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Irradiation from environmental sour-ces, including the earth's crust, the atmosphere, cosmic rays, and ingested radionuclides.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There are few regions in the world known to be high background radiation areas due to local geology and geochemical effects that cause enhanced levels of terrestrial radiation [2].
The terrestrial radiation is attenuated by two different phenomena, (i) atmospheric scattering by air molecules, water vapor and aerosols, and (ii) atmospheric absorption by mainly ozone, water and carbon dioxide.
We are exposed to background radiation from sunlight, radon in the environment, cosmic radiation from space, medical testing and interventions, building materials, and terrestrial radiation (potassium, uranium, and thorium in the earth).
Autran and Munteanu address the problem of soft errors in digital integrated circuits subjected to the natural terrestrial radiation environment, characterizing it as one of the most important primary limits for modern digital electronic reliability.
The total annual effective dose equivalents (outdoor + indoor) from terrestrial radiation was found to be 0.64 mSv y-1 of which 0.17 mSv y-1 came from outdoor and 0.47 mSv y-1 from indoor exposure.
On average, natural terrestrial radiation contributed 54 nSv/hr, cosmic radiation 45 nSv/hr, and artificial terrestrial radiation 8 nSV/hr.

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