terrace

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ter·race

(ter'as),
To suture in several rows, thus closing a wound through a considerable thickness of tissue.
[thr. O. Fr. fr. L. terra, earth]

terrace

Surgery A layer of sutures used to close thick tissue from the most internal to most external layers. See Sutures.

ter·race

(ter'ăs)
To suture in several rows, in closing a wound through a considerable thickness of tissue.
[thr. O. Fr. fr. L. terra, earth]
References in classic literature ?
The foreground is singular from the number of parallel and step-formed terraces; and the included strip of green valley, with its willow-bushes, is contrasted on both hands with the naked hills.
Baloo went down to the tank for a drink and Bagheera began to put his fur in order, as Kaa glided out into the center of the terrace and brought his jaws together with a ringing snap that drew all the monkeys' eyes upon him.
Edmund's Terrace (I waded breast-high across a torrent of water that was rushing down from the waterworks towards the Albert Road), and emerged upon the grass before the rising of the sun.
The place of the interview between Miss Temple and the Indian has already been described as one of those plat forms of rock, which form a sort of terrace in the mountains of that country, and the face of it, we have said, was both high and perpendicular.
"And he pointed to the further end of the chateau, where a ladder stood resting against the stone brackets supporting the terrace, under the window which I had found open.
By this time the moon had stolen round to the terrace, and soft, mysterious rays of light were slanting already across the lower end of the room.
As the house stood, the terrace side was the dark side; but the broad moonlight showed fair on the gravel walk that ran along the next side to the terrace.
He looked at her with a look of submissive tenderness, kissed her hand, got up, and, in silence, paced up and down the terrace.
opens on to illuminated terrace. Palms, flowers, and brilliant lights.
The latter--a pretty girl of about twenty or twenty-two years, active and lively, the true SOUBRETTE of a great lady--jumped from the step upon which, according to the custom of the time, she was seated, and took her way toward the terrace upon which D'Artagnan had perceived Lubin.
I bounded straight out of the door again, reached that of the house, got, in an instant, upon the drive, and, passing along the terrace as fast as I could rush, turned a corner and came full in sight.
But here he was on Regent Terrace; there was nothing to prevent him going round the end of the hill, and looking from without on the Mackenzies' house.