teres minor muscle

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Related to teres minor: teres minor muscle, teres major, Subscapularis

te·res mi·nor mus·cle

(ter'ēz mī'nŏr mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, upper two thirds of the lateral border of scapula; insertion, lower facet of greater tuberosity of humerus; action, adducts arm and rotates it laterally; nerve supply, axillary (fifth and sixth cervical spinal nerves).
Synonym(s): musculus teres minor [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

teres minor muscle

Shoulder muscle. Origin: upper lateral edge of scapula. Insertion: greater tubercle of humerus. Nerve: axillary (C4-C6). Action: laterally rotates arm.
See also: muscle
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) supraspinatus; (2) middle part of deltoid; (3) teres minor; (4) anterior and posterior part of deltoid.
Caption: Figure 5: Sagittal T1 MRI: (1) humeral head, (2) acromion, (3) supraspinatus muscle, (4) infraspinatus muscle, (5) teres minor muscle, and (6) teres major rupture.
The muscles surrounding the triangular space were found to be subscapularis, teres minor, teres major, infraspinatus, and long head of triceps brachii.
Ultrasound Findings- Pathology (Tears) Tendons Partial Full Intra- Thickness Thickness Substance Tendinosis Normal Subscapularis 2 0 0 0 48 (4%) (96%) Supraspinatus 20 9 0 7 14 (40%) (18%) (14%) (28%) Infraspinatus 0 0 0 0 50 (100%) Teres Minor 0 0 0 0 50 (100%) Biceps 0 0 0 3 (6%) 47 (94%) Table 4.
The infraspinatus and teres minor are most commonly known for their roles as the primary external rotators of the GH joint (11,12).
Repair of the subscapularis with rTSA significantly increased the force required by the posterior deltoid, total deltoid, infraspinatus, teres minor, total posterior cuff, and pectoralis major muscles and also significantly increased the meanjoint reaction force during scapular abduction with the elbow flexed to 90[degrees] relative to when the subscapularis was not repaired (Table 1).
The deltoid and rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis) act in a synergistic manner to provide a balanced force couple at the glenohumeral joint.
Every coach installs exercises that work the major superficial muscles of the shoulders, but this is often done at the expense of the smaller, intrinsic rotator cuff musculature (i.e., supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis).
The suprascapular nerve also supplies the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle of the rotator cuff, with some branches to teres minor (1,7,8).
The common term "rotator cuff" actually describes four small muscles in the shoulder: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor. They hold the ball-and-socket shoulder joint in place while allowing the arm to rotate.
Take a good look at the word lists on this page, in previous issues, and on our Web site: Beginner Words (ages 6 and under) cell egg gums pulp crown pore tears navel freckles moles water mucus pulse reflex fiber Junior words (ages 7 and 8) vagus arch node bile duct gallbladder hammer septum tailbone back shaft bulb palm sweat toes Advanced Words (ages 9 and 10) duodenum omentum transverse plexus abdomen adrenal palatine ophthalmic venous sinus vertebral column lymph node facial nerve vitreous humor stirrup cementum Super Words (ages 11 and 12) deltoid rotator cuff supraspinatus teres minor infraspinatus subscapularis levator scapulae rhomboid major rhomboid minor latissimus dorsi splenius external oblique coracoid acromion
The rotator cuff is actually four muscles (subscapularis, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, and teres minor) and their tendons; it stabilizes the upper arm in the shoulder socket and allows it its range of motion.