teres major


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teres major

a thick flat muscle of the shoulder. It functions to adduct, extend, and rotate the arm medially. Compare teres minor.
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Teres major and teres minor
References in periodicals archive ?
Various muscle transfers such as trapezius, pectoralis major and teres major, latissimus dorsi, combined biceps and triceps, gracilis, and combined muscle transfers have been used in the secondary reconstruction of the shoulder.
First, we concentrate on the PHCA passing under the fused tendons of the teres major (musculus teres major, TM) and the latissimus dorsi (musculus latissimus dorsi, LD).
In 1934, L'Episcopo (14) described the transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major to the lateral humerus to improve external rotation.
insertion of the musculus teres major forms a rough fossa, absent = 0, present = 1;
4% Posterior Wear Infraspinatus Teres Major Teres Minor 38 mm Standard, No Wear -1.
Van Thienen CA has described that distribution of collateral branches to serratus anterior (44%), subscapularis (23%) and teres major (3%).
The posterior circumflex humeral artery may arise from the profunda brachii artery and pass back below the teres major instead of passing through the quadrangular space (Johnson & Ellis, 2005).
Eight muscles were simulated as three lines from its origin on the scapula or clavicle to its insertion on the humerus: anterior deltoid (yellow), middle deltoid (dark green), posterior deltoid (magenta), subscapularis (light green), infraspinatus (dark blue), teres major (red), teres minor (cyan), and the clavicular portion of the pectoralis major (orange) (Fig.
Both the axillary arteries with their branches traversed upto lower border of teres major muscle and continued further as seperate entities into the cubital fossa as brachial artery I and brachial artery II respectively.
It begins at the outer border of the first rib, and ends nominally at the inferior border of the teres major muscle, after which it is named the brachial artery.
2-4) Given the natural predominance of internal rotator muscles in a normally functioning shoulder--four internal rotators (subscapularis, teres major, pectoralis major, and latissimus dorsi) vs.
From the wide attachment fibers of this muscle, a thick mass forms and turns round the inferolateral border of teres major muscle and finally attach to the humeral intertubercular sulcus by a tendinous band with about 7cm long.