teratology

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teratology

 [ter″ah-tol´ah-je]
that division of embryology and pathology dealing with abnormal development and congenital deformations. See also developmental toxicology. adj., adj teratolog´ic.

ter·a·tol·o·gy

(ter'ă-tol'ŏ-jē),
The branch of embryology and pathology concerned with the production, development, anatomy, and classification of malformed embryos.
See also: dysmorphology.
[terato- + G. logos, study]

teratology

(tĕr′ə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The biological study of birth defects.

ter′a·to·log′i·cal (-ə-tl-ŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ter′a·tol′o·gist n.

ter·a·tol·o·gy

(ter'ă-tol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of embryologic science concerned with the production, development, anatomy, and classification of malformed embryos or fetuses.
See also: dysmorphology
[terato- + G. logos, study]

teratology

The study of the processes operating during early embryonic and fetal development that lead to major anomalies of body structure.

teratology

the study of abnormalities in structures, such as malformations.

ter·a·tol·o·gy

(ter'ă-tol'ŏ-jē)
Embryologic science concerned with the production, development, anatomy, and classification of malformed embryos or fetuses.
[terato- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
Teratologists find the new data intriguing, but they emphasize that extensive efforts are needed to establish the details of cocaine's in utero impact.
Briggs, who led a 2015 report examining the role of pregnant women in phase 4 clinical drug trials, added that the document should take note of recommendations from clinical teratologists regarding the design of animal studies that should be performed prior to human trials (Am J Obstet Gynecol.
All of this agrees with what Ambroise Pare and other teratologists of the Renaissance identified with the monster and gives Cervantes an excuse to populate his book with a myriad of extraordinary beings that, like the hybrid Quijano/Quijote, challenge the moral, ontological, and epistemological categories of seventeenth-century Spain and demand to be exhibited and marveled at like the mad hidalgo from La Mancha.
"Most teratologists would not consider some of these things to be major birth defects," she noted.