teratogenicity


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ter·a·to·ge·nic·i·ty

(ter'ă-tō-jĕ-nis'i-tē),
The property or capability of producing congenital malformations.
[terato- + G. genesis, generation]

ter·a·to·ge·nic·i·ty

(ter'ă-tō-jĕ-nis'i-tē)
The property or capability of producing congenital anomalies.
[terato- + G. genesis, generation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding the mechanism of drug teratogenicity could educate and also provide a foundation for prevention of fetal malformations in epileptic and non-epileptic women who are taking this drug during pregnancy25.
With this knowledge, the present study was conducted to evaluate the anti-angiogenicity and teratogenicity of H.
Teratogenicity of retinoic acid and its effects on TGF-beta2 expression in the developing cerebral cortex of the rat.
Embryoprotective efficacy of Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) extract against developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of mercuric chloride in the chick.
Teratogenicity in pregnant mice: The study was carried out after approval from Animal Ethics Committee of University College of Pharmacy (UCP), University of the Punjab (PU), Lahore-Pakistan, (Approval No.: AEC/UCP1009/ 4313 Ph) on albino female virgin mice (n = 45) of8-12 weeks old, weighing 25-30 grams.
An attempt should be made to reduce the dose of VPA below 1 000 mg/day, as the risk of teratogenicity is much higher above this dose.
Preclinical data for lorcaserin did not suggest teratogenicity, but maternal exposure in rats late in gestation resulted in lower pup body weight that persisted into adulthood.
Neither exposure to cigarette nor marijuana smoke has evidence for teratogenicity, but both have been implicated in developmental and hyperactivity disorders in children.
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) defines hazardous drugs as drugs that have the following characteristics: carcinogenicity, teratogenicity or other developmental toxicity, reproductive toxicity, organ toxicity at low doses and genotoxicity.
Teratogenicity is the best-known serious adverse effect, and the risk of 'retinoid embryopathy' is as high as for thalidomide; mucocutaneous side-effects include initial worsening of acne, xerosis and cheilitis, retinoid dermatitis, and staphylococcal infections of the skin; ocular complications include dry eyes that can persist indefinitely; and severe depression can occur as a rare and idiosyncratic event requiring prompt attention.
We assumed that clinicians would discuss with patients the teratogenicity of valproate, along with other common side effects--weight gain, pancreatitis, effect on liver function tests, thrombocytopenia, and polycystic ovary syndrome--before initiating the drug.