teratogen


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

teratogen

 [ter´ah-to-jen]
an agent or influence that causes physical defects in the developing embryo; called also developmental toxicant. adj., adj teratogen´ic.

ter·a·to·gen

(ter'ă-tō-jen),
Any agent (for example, a drug) or factor that induces or increases incidence of abnormal prenatal development.
[terato- + G. -gen, producing]

teratogen

(tə-răt′ə-jən, tĕr′ə-tə-)
n.
An agent, such as a virus, a drug, or radiation, that causes malformation of an embryo or fetus.

teratogen

Genetics Any agent, chemical, or factor that causes a physical defect in a developing embryo or fetus; maternal medications with known teratogenic effects include aminopterin–spontaneous abortion, malformations; anticoagulants; anticonvulsants; cytotoxic drugs; mepivacaine–bradycardia, death; methimazole & propylthiouracil-goiter; 131I–destruction of fetal thyroid; ♂ sex hormones–methyltestosterone, 17-α-ethinyl-testosterone, 17-α-ethinyl-19-nortestosterone–causes masculinization of ♀, tetracycline–hypoplasia and pigmentation of tooth enamel; trimethadione–abortion, multiple malformations, mental retardation; ♀ sex hormones cause virilization with defective external genitalia, transplacental carcinogenesis by DES. See Fetal warfarin syndrome, Fetal hydantoin syndrome, Thalidomide. Cf Litogen.

ter·a·to·gen

(ter'ă-tō-jen)
A drug or other agent that can produce congenital anomalies or birth defects or increase the incidence of an anomaly in the population.
[terato- + G. -gen, producing]

teratogen

Any agent capable of causing a severe congenital bodily anomaly (monstrosity).

teratogen

a substance which increases the incidence of congenital malformations.

Teratogen

Any substance, agent, or process that interferes with normal prenatal development, causing the formation of one or more developmental abnormalities of the fetus.

ter·a·to·gen

(ter'ă-tō-jen)
Any substance that induces incidence of abnormal prenatal development.
[terato- + G. -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to this geometric restriction, it was possible for the researchers to study the effect of teratogens, which may alter the shape and even the eventual position of the mesoendoderm layer.
This observation is probably explained by genetic influences on the aetiology of NTDs and/or repeated or persistent environmental exposures and teratogens. In this study, a small proportion of the mothers had diabetes or they were epileptics on therapy; however, a further study with a larger sample would be required to analyse the impact of various known teratogens on the NTDs in this population.
(2) The embryonic period (from 3-9 weeks) is the most sensitive period during which teratogens can be particular damaging.
However, the question as to what minimal change in a developmental parameter would display the presence of a potential teratogen is still challenging.
more than five standard drinks on one occasion (Kvigne 2003), at a point where embryonic or fetal development is particularly vulnerable to teratogens, may also be at risk of giving birth to an alcohol effected child.
According to Schardein (1993), "animal species successfully demonstrate the potential for teratogenic effect for all known human teratogens." With this in mind, meclizine could very well be considered a potential human teratogen.
Notably, the medical argument that alcohol was a teratogen found public acceptance.
OK, scient panel, alcohol is a carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen (do I get an "A" in science for spelling those babies correctly?) So why endanger the witless consumer by limiting the cancer statement to licensed beverages?
While we have robust information regarding the reproductive safety of sodium valproate, it is a teratogen with a very high risk for neural tube defects.
In one study of 1,694 adolescents and young women aged 14 to 25 years who were prescribed a teratogen, only 29% received documented contraception counseling, and only 11% received a contraceptive prescription or were documented to be actively using a contraceptive.
Alitretinoin is a potent teratogen, like other retinoids, but its relatively short half-life of 2-10 hours means that women of childbearing potential must continue on contraception for 1 month posttreatment, compared with 3 years for acitretin.
Patients who require treatment with a mood stabilizer, particularly those with recurrent disease, may consider a trial of lithium, which, while a teratogen, is associated with an extremely small risk for a cardiovascular malformation.