teratogen


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teratogen

 [ter´ah-to-jen]
an agent or influence that causes physical defects in the developing embryo; called also developmental toxicant. adj., adj teratogen´ic.

ter·a·to·gen

(ter'ă-tō-jen),
Any agent (for example, a drug) or factor that induces or increases incidence of abnormal prenatal development.
[terato- + G. -gen, producing]

teratogen

/ter·a·to·gen/ (ter´ah-to-jen) any agent or factor that induces or increases the incidence of abnormal prenatal development.teratogen´ic

teratogen

(tə-răt′ə-jən, tĕr′ə-tə-)
n.
An agent, such as a virus, a drug, or radiation, that causes malformation of an embryo or fetus.

teratogen

[ter′ətəjen′]
Etymology: Gk, teras + genein, to produce
any substance, agent, or process that interferes with normal prenatal development, causing the formation of one or more developmental abnormalities in the fetus. Teratogens act directly on the developing organism or indirectly, affecting such supplemental structures as the placenta or some maternal system. The type and extent of the defect are determined by the specific kind of teratogen, its mode of action, the embryonic process affected, genetic predisposition, and the stage of development at the time the exposure occurred. The period of highest vulnerability in the developing embryo is from about the third through the twelfth week of gestation, when differentiation of the major organs and systems occurs. Susceptibility to teratogenic influence decreases rapidly in the later periods of development, which are characterized by growth and elaboration. Among the known teratogens are chemical agents, including such drugs as thalidomide, alkylating agents, and alcohol; infectious agents, especially the rubella virus and cytomegalovirus; ionizing radiation, particularly x-rays; and environmental factors, such as the age and general health of the mother or any intrauterine trauma that may affect the fetus, especially during the later stages of pregnancy. Also called teratogenic agent. Compare mutagen. teratogenic, adj.

teratogen

Genetics Any agent, chemical, or factor that causes a physical defect in a developing embryo or fetus; maternal medications with known teratogenic effects include aminopterin–spontaneous abortion, malformations; anticoagulants; anticonvulsants; cytotoxic drugs; mepivacaine–bradycardia, death; methimazole & propylthiouracil-goiter; 131I–destruction of fetal thyroid; ♂ sex hormones–methyltestosterone, 17-α-ethinyl-testosterone, 17-α-ethinyl-19-nortestosterone–causes masculinization of ♀, tetracycline–hypoplasia and pigmentation of tooth enamel; trimethadione–abortion, multiple malformations, mental retardation; ♀ sex hormones cause virilization with defective external genitalia, transplacental carcinogenesis by DES. See Fetal warfarin syndrome, Fetal hydantoin syndrome, Thalidomide. Cf Litogen.

ter·a·to·gen

(ter'ă-tō-jen)
A drug or other agent that can produce congenital anomalies or birth defects or increase the incidence of an anomaly in the population.
[terato- + G. -gen, producing]

teratogen

Any agent capable of causing a severe congenital bodily anomaly (monstrosity).

teratogen

a substance which increases the incidence of congenital malformations.

Teratogen

Any substance, agent, or process that interferes with normal prenatal development, causing the formation of one or more developmental abnormalities of the fetus.

teratogen

; teratogenic agent causing abnormal fetal development

teratogen (t·raˑ·t·gn),

n a process, a substance, or an agent that interferes with regular, thus causing developmental abnormalities within a fetus. Examples include alkylating agents, thalidomide, and alcohol; infectious microbes like cytome-galovirus or the rubella virus; ionizing radiation such as x-rays; and environmental aspects such as the mother's age and overall health or trauma to the fetus during the gestational period.

ter·a·to·gen

(ter'ă-tō-jen)
Any substance that induces incidence of abnormal prenatal development.
[terato- + G. -gen, producing]

teratogen

an agent or influence that causes physical defects in the developing embryo.
References in periodicals archive ?
An analysis of exposure to potential teratogens showed that 1.
Many of these children display a range of cognitive and behavioural disorders (Welch-Carre 2005), which has led to alcohol being regarded as a behavioural teratogen and a leading cause of mental retardation in the Western world (Dunty 2001).
Meclizine has been a "suspect" teratogen for years, as indicated by Schardein (1993).
Notably, the medical argument that alcohol was a teratogen found public acceptance.
Efavirenz has been classified as a potential teratogen and should be avoided in early pregnancy.
One with bilateral enlarged kidneys with abnormal function whose mother was receiving ambrisentan, a known teratogen, for portal hypertension.
The study, conducted by researchers from California Teratogen Information Service (CTIS) Pregnancy Health Information Line, uses data obtained by counsellors at the CTIS Pregnancy Health Information Line, a toll-free service offering evidence-based clinical information about exposures during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
Alitretinoin is a potent teratogen, like other retinoids.
Jones and his associates studied 82 children aged 4-14 years whose mothers were taking anticonvulsant monotherapy and contacted the California Teratogen Information Service (CTIS) during their pregnancies.
She is director of the California Teratogen Information Service and Clinical Research Program.
A paternal exposure is anything the father of the baby is exposed to before or during his partner's pregnancy," explained Christina Chambers, professor of pediatrics and director of the California Teratogen Information Service (CTIS) Pregnancy Health Information Line.
Hayes has found evidence that Atrazine is a teratogen, causing demasculinization in male frogs and is an estrogen disruptor.