tenure

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Related to tenurial: tenuring

tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(12) Coexistence of all three tenurial practices-fixed-rent, pure sharecropping without cost sharing and sharecropping with cost sharing is prevalent in our surveyed villages.
Many contributors to the literature have argued that tenurial arrangements influence adaptation.
(46) This was in fact one of the conditions that justified the dissolution of tenurial relationship.
The agricultural revival following the population collapse in the Black Death and the devastation of the Hundred Years' War had imposed great burdens on the seigneurial class, which had to make expensive tenurial concessions in order to attract workers back on to their lands.
Shah) am the King of Magarant" (quoted in Gurung, 2001: 19); "Prithvi Narayan Shah gave internal autonomy to Limbu" (Bhattachan, 1995: 137); and "King respected the customs of a country in the tenurial administration of his possessions" (Burghat, 1996: 238).
Unlike the earlier agrarian reform program initiated in the early 1970s, the CARP covers all agricultural lands, regardless of commodity produced and type of tenurial arrangement, and includes the provision of support services for farmers.
"The Role of Tenurial Shells in Ecological Sustainability: Property Rights and Natural Resource Management in Mexico", dans S.
Hindu women's inheritance in tenancy land thus depends on state-level tenurial laws, which in most northwestern states specify an order of devolution that strongly favors male agnatic heirs.
Such issues include critical JFM policy weaknesses, commitment to CFM, need for procedural, tenurial and legal changes, and the importance of training and restructuring programs to build capacity for co-management.
The present land tenurial position in Scotland is, essentially, an anachronism in the modern world, leading to conflicts over the ownership, use, and management of land resources in different localities throughout Scotland.(1) Furthermore, the feudal legal arrangements and relationships associated with the present highly concentrated pattern.
Simpson's A History of Land Law articulates the historical change from "communal rights" of the commons to individual rights, which both made possible and were produced by enclosure: "[t]he tenurial system converted the villagers [who used the land as common village property] into tenants, and the theory of the law placed the freehold of most of the lands of the manor in the lord....