tenure

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tenure

[ten′yər]
Etymology: L, tenere, to hold
1 (in a university) a faculty appointment with few limits on the number of years it may be held.
2 a permanent appointment usually awarded to a person who has advanced to the rank of associate professor and who demonstrates scholarship, community service, and teaching excellence in a specific field of study.

tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our research shows that of tenure, engagement and talent, talent is the strongest predictor of performance.
To understand the combined effect of tenure, engagement and talent on performance, my colleagues and I launched a large-scale study.
Hitting the Trifecta of Tenure, Engagement and Talent
The Land Tenure and Water Rights Reform review will focus on:
a description of existing tenure systems across northern Australia (and proposed in WA), including prevalence, common features and important differences
a description of how specific tenure arrangements impede or support industry and/or business development, along with an indication of the relative importance of impediments
that tenure "during good Behaviour" is actually synonymous
because only judges have good-behavior tenure, the Constitution might be
Neither impeachment nor good-behavior tenure originated with the
The tenure decision from the university comes from specific individuals within the institution (Cawyer, Sanders & Schrodt, 2003).
Trust is an important issue when dealing with post tenure monitoring.
Varma (2001) states that the merits of the tenure system have an influence on academic freedom.