tenure

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tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
that without the leave of Parliament, the Crown could not grant tenures
with variable tenures, any grant of good-behavior tenure was valid even
Though, the committee is yet to announce cut, information received so far by this paper indicates that tenure of senior senators is to be reduced to seven years, junior senators five years and members of the House of Representatives to five years respectively.
Dimgba held that the resolution of the NEC of the part, in its meeting held on the 27th February, 2018, was a case of party organ trying to extend its tenure, which he noted was different from the case the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), where it was the National Convention of the party that set up the Care Taker Committee.
He said if the attempt to extend the tenure of the John Odigie-Oyegun led an executive committee of the APC had matured, it would have amounted to a violation of the constitution of the party and that of the country.
Further, our analysis shows that talented employees with longer tenures can achieve above-average performance even in work environments that are not very engaging.
6.25%, while for tenure of 61 days to less than 1 year, the same has
Currently, the tribunal heads have a tenure of two years.
Although a 50-bps hike for the commonest loan tenure of 36 months amounts to an increase of just Rs 25 per lakh-or Rs 1,200 a year for a Rs 4 lakh small car or Rs 1,800 a year for a mid-size sedan-the impact is not the same on everyone.
Stereotypes informing the Indigenous land reform debate were reinforced by two prominent international theories around land reform --evolutionary theory and tenure formalisation or 'security'--with the extensive literature on these theories reviewed in Chapter 2.
Tenure is a key issue for women, who are more likely than men to leave the labor force when they have children, disrupting their tenure and potentially harming their future earnings.