tenure


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tenure

[ten′yər]
Etymology: L, tenere, to hold
1 (in a university) a faculty appointment with few limits on the number of years it may be held.
2 a permanent appointment usually awarded to a person who has advanced to the rank of associate professor and who demonstrates scholarship, community service, and teaching excellence in a specific field of study.

tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
They will also discuss requirements to convert a portion of a pastoral lease or other Crown land to a higher and more secure tenure as part of the Land Tenure Pathway for Irrigated Agriculture (LTPIA) project.
He had been splitting time between the University of Minnesota and the University of Memphis in the 1990s when one of his deans gave him an ultimatum: Commit to Minneapolis full-time or give up tenure.
By turning the tables on the typical inverse relationship between tenure and engagement, companies stand to make dramatic performance gains.
Pulda, do critics of tenure maintain that experienced teachers as such are "burnt-out cases.
25%, while for tenure of 61 days to less than 1 year, the same has
The Wall Street Journal highlighted director tenure in an article titled "The 40-Year Club: America's Longest Serving Directors" (July 16, 2013).
12, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- According to executive search consulting firm Spencer Stuart, CFO tenure is on the rise among Fortune 500 CFOs.
Popal asserted the Organization's commitment to offer all possible aid to Yemen, valuing highly the support and cooperation he enjoyed from the government during his tenure in Yemen.
Employee tenure by industry depends on many factors, one of which is age.
A source in the party told that the party had informed the ECP that under the party's constitution, the party's central working committee (CWC) might extend the tenure of the party office-bearers for one more year.
WITH many retired high court judges showing reluctance to head various benches of the armed forces tribunal due to a short tenure, the standing committee on defence is all set to recommend an enhanced term for them.
Many banks are of the view that equated monthly instalments cannot be modified to make them less painful to customers, and they are now looking to extend the tenure of repayment to make such payments more affordable, at least in the short term.