tenure


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tenure

[ten′yər]
Etymology: L, tenere, to hold
1 (in a university) a faculty appointment with few limits on the number of years it may be held.
2 a permanent appointment usually awarded to a person who has advanced to the rank of associate professor and who demonstrates scholarship, community service, and teaching excellence in a specific field of study.

tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said he was later told that tenure was a requirement for the job.
Our research shows that of tenure, engagement and talent, talent is the strongest predictor of performance.
Ensure appropriate board composition in light of increasing focus on director tenure and diversity
The recommendation for extending the tenure is likely to be accepted.
Those with legitimate minority viewpoints claim that tenure is their only protection, that it is the only way to guarantee some form of dissent on campus.
Renee Rohs at Northwest Missouri State University makes a convincing case that recognizing undergraduate research through annual evaluations can provide the accumulated evidence needed to justify tenure and promotion.
Before Massachusetts introduced teacher tenure in 1886, women were sometimes dismissed for getting married, becoming pregnant, wearing pants or being out too late in the evenings.
Mentor or tenure adviser worth her salt will tell you to "just say no" to as many extra obligations and responsibilities as possible during your pre-tenure years.
It seems clear that what was once considered the "traditional" tenure model no longer works.
Given the issues associated with child-bearing during the probationary period, tenure-track women may gamble with tenure to begin a family before they reach 35 years, gamble with pregnancy outcomes to maximize the chances for a positive tenure decision, or decide to forego motherhood altogether.
Bounds said his research into the tenure policy of other states--such as Tennessee and Georgia--indicates these changes are not radical.