tension

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tension

 [ten´shun]
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained; the degree to which something is stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, such as oxygen in blood.
5. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
6. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.
arterial tension blood pressure within an artery.
carbon dioxide tension the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood, noted as pCO2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
electric tension electromotive force.
intraocular tension intraocular pressure.
surface tension tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn),
1. The act of stretching.
2. The condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
3. The partial pressure of a gas, especially that of a gas dissolved in a liquid such as blood.
4. Mental, emotional, or nervous strain; strained relations or barely controlled hostility between people or groups.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]

tension

/ten·sion/ (ten´shun)
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture.
4. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
5. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.

arterial tension  blood pressure within an artery.
intraocular tension  (T) see under pressure.
intravenous tension  venous pressure.
surface tension  tension or resistance which acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension  a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells which prevents overaction of any part.

tension

(tĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of stretching something tight.
b. The condition of so being stretched; tautness.
2.
a. A force tending to stretch or elongate something.
b. A measure of such a force: a tension on the cable of 50 pounds.

ten′sion·al adj.

tension

[ten′shən]
Etymology: L, tendere, to stretch
1 the act of pulling or straining until taut.
2 the condition of being taut, tense, or under pressure.
3 a state or condition resulting from the psychological and physiological reaction to a stressful situation. It is characterized physically by a general increase in muscle tonus, heart rate, respiration rate, and alertness and psychologically by feelings of strain, uneasiness, irritability, and anxiety. See also stress.

tension

Vox populi A general term for any form of actual or perceived pressure. See Tension headache.

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn)
1. The act of stretching.
2. The condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
3. The partial pressure of a gas, especially that of a gas dissolved in a liquid such as blood.
4. Mental, emotional, or nervous strain; strained relations or barely controlled hostility between people or groups.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]

tension

Muscle contraction as a reflection of anxiety. Most headaches are caused in this way. Tension, and associated symptoms, can often be relieved by formal relaxation procedures.

tension

force with which a body or object resists extension. Also known as tension load.

tension

imposition of load tending to stretch an object (object becomes longer and thinner along line of applied force)

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn)
1. Act of stretching.
2. Condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]

tension (ten´shən),

n the state of being stretched, strained, or extended.
tension headache,
n a pain that affects the head as the result of overwork or emotional strain, involving tension in the muscles of the neck, face, and shoulders.
tension, interfacial surface,
n the tension or resistance to separation possessed by the film of liquid between two well-adapted surfaces (e.g., the thin film of saliva between the denture base and the tissues).

tension

1. the act of stretching or the condition of being stretched or strained.
2. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, e.g. of oxygen in blood.
3. voltage.

arterial tension
blood pressure within an artery.
tension band wires
heavy gauge wire is inserted in fracture fragments and around pins placed in the fragments in order and adjusted to create compression on the fracture site. Suited for treatment of apophyseal or epiphyseal avulsion fractures. See also tension band plate.
intraocular tension
intraocular pressure; intraocular tension, normal intraocular tension being indicated by Tn, while T + 1, T + 2, etc. indicate increased tension, and T − 1, T − 2, etc. indicate decreased tension.
tension line
the direction of pull on the skin in any given region. A map of the body, drawn to show the various lines of pull, or tension, is useful in planning surgical closure of skin incisions, particularly ones with defects, in order to minimize forces that might cause dehiscence.
surface tension
tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension
a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.

Patient discussion about tension

Q. What are the symptoms of tension and migraine headaches? I get a lot of headaches and wanted to know if there is a way to tell if I am having migraines or regular tension headaches.

A. Check out this website, its all about headaches and migraines:
http://headaches.about.com/od/headpain101/a/what_is.htm

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

More discussions about tension
References in periodicals archive ?
2 and 3 shows that this proposed approach still requires that the simple compressional and tensional strengths in a given direction must be equal.
Melody is an art form created from tensional resistance.
This platform uses even more advanced high-strength steel than before, and as a result it is stiffer in both tensional and bending rigidity.
The failure of the attempt, the imminence of fatal danger, the scenario of making the political convict disappear, and the adoption of a parallel identity are relived through the mechanism of autobiographic writing, the reconstruction of the tensional coherence of the events being part of the fictional project.
The Tensional Network of the Human Body Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier 2012 (pp 137-142)
5,6) Some of these domes are exceptionally large, and most of them are associated with faults or linear rilles of presumably tensional origin.
The adjacent area probably sagged along a northwest-southeast orientated fracture during this period to ease tensional build-up, resulting in the Nupe depression forming a side basin.
Numerous short-lived lakes occupied a series of tensional basins which began to open after 16 Ma in what is now the state of Nevada and adjoining areas.
Epistemological origins, changes and horizons of the glocal phenomenon--from the normative-celebrative interests of the enterprise field to the tensional resignifications in the humanities and social sciences
When a structural member sustains tensional loads, the engineer must be able to calculate the amount of twist produced and also the shear stresses set up.
The tensional rigidity was also put into consideration.