tension


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tension

 [ten´shun]
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained; the degree to which something is stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, such as oxygen in blood.
5. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
6. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.
arterial tension blood pressure within an artery.
carbon dioxide tension the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood, noted as pCO2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
electric tension electromotive force.
intraocular tension intraocular pressure.
surface tension tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn),
1. The act of stretching.
2. The condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
3. The partial pressure of a gas, especially that of a gas dissolved in a liquid such as blood.
4. Mental, emotional, or nervous strain; strained relations or barely controlled hostility between people or groups.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]

tension

/ten·sion/ (ten´shun)
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture.
4. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
5. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.

arterial tension  blood pressure within an artery.
intraocular tension  (T) see under pressure.
intravenous tension  venous pressure.
surface tension  tension or resistance which acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension  a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells which prevents overaction of any part.

tension

(tĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of stretching something tight.
b. The condition of so being stretched; tautness.
2.
a. A force tending to stretch or elongate something.
b. A measure of such a force: a tension on the cable of 50 pounds.

ten′sion·al adj.

tension

[ten′shən]
Etymology: L, tendere, to stretch
1 the act of pulling or straining until taut.
2 the condition of being taut, tense, or under pressure.
3 a state or condition resulting from the psychological and physiological reaction to a stressful situation. It is characterized physically by a general increase in muscle tonus, heart rate, respiration rate, and alertness and psychologically by feelings of strain, uneasiness, irritability, and anxiety. See also stress.

tension

Vox populi A general term for any form of actual or perceived pressure. See Tension headache.

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn)
1. The act of stretching.
2. The condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
3. The partial pressure of a gas, especially that of a gas dissolved in a liquid such as blood.
4. Mental, emotional, or nervous strain; strained relations or barely controlled hostility between people or groups.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]

tension

Muscle contraction as a reflection of anxiety. Most headaches are caused in this way. Tension, and associated symptoms, can often be relieved by formal relaxation procedures.

tension

force with which a body or object resists extension. Also known as tension load.

tension

imposition of load tending to stretch an object (object becomes longer and thinner along line of applied force)

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn)
1. Act of stretching.
2. Condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]

tension (ten´shən),

n the state of being stretched, strained, or extended.
tension headache,
n a pain that affects the head as the result of overwork or emotional strain, involving tension in the muscles of the neck, face, and shoulders.
tension, interfacial surface,
n the tension or resistance to separation possessed by the film of liquid between two well-adapted surfaces (e.g., the thin film of saliva between the denture base and the tissues).

tension

1. the act of stretching or the condition of being stretched or strained.
2. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, e.g. of oxygen in blood.
3. voltage.

arterial tension
blood pressure within an artery.
tension band wires
heavy gauge wire is inserted in fracture fragments and around pins placed in the fragments in order and adjusted to create compression on the fracture site. Suited for treatment of apophyseal or epiphyseal avulsion fractures. See also tension band plate.
intraocular tension
intraocular pressure; intraocular tension, normal intraocular tension being indicated by Tn, while T + 1, T + 2, etc. indicate increased tension, and T − 1, T − 2, etc. indicate decreased tension.
tension line
the direction of pull on the skin in any given region. A map of the body, drawn to show the various lines of pull, or tension, is useful in planning surgical closure of skin incisions, particularly ones with defects, in order to minimize forces that might cause dehiscence.
surface tension
tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension
a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.

Patient discussion about tension

Q. What are the symptoms of tension and migraine headaches? I get a lot of headaches and wanted to know if there is a way to tell if I am having migraines or regular tension headaches.

A. Check out this website, its all about headaches and migraines:
http://headaches.about.com/od/headpain101/a/what_is.htm

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

More discussions about tension
References in classic literature ?
The poor dear lady shivered, and I could see the tension of her nerves as she clasped her husband closer to her and bent her head lower and lower still on his breast.
These glass cases are covered with a case of steel, and weighted with a pellet of lead; they are real Leyden bottles, into which the electricity is forced to a very high tension.
It is possibly due to the tension of my mind, at the time, but even now that start into the hot stillness of the tropical afternoon is a singularly vivid impression.
The Journalist tried to relieve the tension by telling anecdotes of Hettie Potter.
His eyesight was shaken and dazzled by the tension of thought and muscle.
This gentle expression was the more interesting because the schoolmaster's nose, an irregular aquiline twisted a little on one side, had rather a formidable character; and his brow, moreover, had that peculiar tension which always impresses one as a sign of a keen impatient temperament: the blue veins stood out like cords under the transparent yellow skin, and this intimidating brow was softened by no tendency to baldness, for the grey bristly hair, cut down to about an inch in length, stood round it in as close ranks as ever.
Was it that my illness had wrought some happy change in my organization--given a firmer tension to my nerves--carried off some dull obstruction?
Aylmer was pale; but it seemed rather the consequence of a highly-wrought state of mind and tension of spirit than of fear or doubt.
It had been the theory of many superficially-judging persons, he knew, that he was wasting that life in a surrender to sensations, but he had tasted of no pleasure so fine as his actual tension, had been introduced to no sport that demanded at once the patience and the nerve of this stalking of a creature more subtle, yet at bay perhaps more formidable, than any beast of the forest.
Maud Blessingbourne, when she lowered her book into her lap, closed her eyes with a conscious patience that seemed to say she waited; but it was nevertheless she who at last made the movement representing a snap of their tension.
My limbs were weary and stiff, for I feared to change my position; yet my nerves were worked up to the highest pitch of tension, and my hearing was so acute that I could not only hear the gentle breathing of my companions, but I could distinguish the deeper, heavier in-breath of the bulky Jones from the thin, sighing note of the bank director.
Even at that moment of tension I found time for amazement at the discovery that he was quite a short man, his head not higher than my shoulder--a stunted Hercules whose tremendous vitality had all run to depth, breadth, and brain.