tension

(redirected from tensile)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to tensile: tensile strain, Tensile test

tension

 [ten´shun]
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained; the degree to which something is stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, such as oxygen in blood.
5. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
6. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.
arterial tension blood pressure within an artery.
carbon dioxide tension the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood, noted as pCO2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
electric tension electromotive force.
intraocular tension intraocular pressure.
surface tension tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn),
1. The act of stretching.
2. The condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
3. The partial pressure of a gas, especially that of a gas dissolved in a liquid such as blood.
4. Mental, emotional, or nervous strain; strained relations or barely controlled hostility between people or groups.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tension

(tĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of stretching something tight.
b. The condition of so being stretched; tautness.
2.
a. A force tending to stretch or elongate something.
b. A measure of such a force: a tension on the cable of 50 pounds.

ten′sion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tension

Vox populi A general term for any form of actual or perceived pressure. See Tension headache.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn)
1. The act of stretching.
2. The condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
3. The partial pressure of a gas, especially that of a gas dissolved in a liquid such as blood.
4. Mental, emotional, or nervous strain; strained relations or barely controlled hostility between people or groups.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tension

Muscle contraction as a reflection of anxiety. Most headaches are caused in this way. Tension, and associated symptoms, can often be relieved by formal relaxation procedures.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ten·sion

(ten'shŭn)
1. Act of stretching.
2. Condition of being stretched or tense, or a stretching or pulling force.
[L. tensio, fr. tendo, pp. tensus, to stretch]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about tension

Q. What are the symptoms of tension and migraine headaches? I get a lot of headaches and wanted to know if there is a way to tell if I am having migraines or regular tension headaches.

A. Check out this website, its all about headaches and migraines:
http://headaches.about.com/od/headpain101/a/what_is.htm

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

More discussions about tension
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Concrete structures may be exposed to elevated temperatures at which deterioration of concrete occurs and it leads to deterioration of Compressive strength, tensile strength, Split tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and impact strength.
LTI offers a wide range of mechanical testing services including hardness, fatigue, fracture toughness, stress rupture, charpy impact, tensile and more to a vast range of industries.
After the curing period, the specimens were tested for splitting tensile strength.
Figure 3 shows the dependence of the relative tensile strength of inorganic plate-like particulate reinforced polymer composites on the aspect ratio of the fillers as [K.sub.1] = 1.
Figure 2 shows the results of tensile specimens which are glued after the previous treatment with two types of adhesives (PVAc and PU), and examined by standard methods.
(2007) studied tensile and flexural properties of aspen fiber--polypropylene composites with 0 to 60 percent (wt/wt) fiber loadings.
Although the crack classification of the tensile crack and the shear crack in the SiGMA analysis was referred to as identical to mode I and mode II in fiber-reinforced concrete (Carpinteri et al., 2007), the treatment is not rational.
Fig.2 shows the average tensile stress Vs % weight fraction of the fibre.
"They also had a chance to have hands-on experience in building models of tensile structures and to learn about the design software packages used for such structures," he added.
One of them is due to development of tensile stress in the restrained shrinkage condition.
will build more models using a new type of steel that combines high tensile strength with a previously unachievable degree of formability, resulting in lighter vehicles that can help lower emissions while protecting occupants.