tenosynovitis


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tenosynovitis

 [ten″o-sin″o-vi´tis]
inflammation of a tendon and its sheath, usually seen in the hands and wrists or feet and ankles; it is often the result of intense and continued use, as with pianists and typists. It is painful, and may temporarily disable the affected part. Rheumatoid and other types of arthritis frequently involve tendon sheaths. A less common cause of tenosynovitis is injury to the tendon sheath and subsequent infection. It can also be the result of tuberculous or gonorrheal infection. Treatment is by immobilization of the limb or, in severe cases, by surgery for the purpose of draining an infected sheath, or to release a tendon from a constricting sheath.
villonodular tenosynovitis a condition marked by exaggerated proliferation of synovial membrane cells, producing a solid tumorlike mass, commonly occurring in periarticular soft tissues and less frequently in joints.

ten·o·syn·o·vi·tis

(ten'ō-sin'ō-vī'tis),
Inflammation of a tendon and its enveloping sheath.
[teno- + synovia + G. -itis, inflammation]

tenosynovitis

(tĕn′ō-sĭn′ə-vī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of a tendon sheath.
A digit with a focal fusiform swelling—due to oedema and/or inflammation—of the flexor tendon or tendon sheath which causes a painful lock-snap sensation, leaving the digit in flexion or extension. Trigger finger is most common in women in their sixth decade, and is associated with de Quervain’s disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, tenosynovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and connective tissue disease
Trigger finger in children Idiopathic, linked to chromosome defects, secondary to fractures, tendinous or ligamentous lesions

tenosynovitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of the tendon sheath and tendon, which may be caused by injury, overuse, strain, or, rarely, by infection. See Trigger finger.

ten·o·syn·o·vi·tis

(ten'ō-sin-ō-vī'tis)
Inflammation of a tendon and its enveloping sheath.
Synonym(s): tendinous synovitis, tendosynovitis, tendovaginitis, tenovaginitis.
[teno- + synovia + G. -itis, inflammation]

tenosynovitis

Inflammation of a tendon sheath, usually from overuse. There is pain, swelling, limitation of movement and a creaking sensation on movement of the tendon in its sheath. The condition is treated by rest, immobilization and injections of corticosteroid drugs around the affected tendon.

Tenosynovitis

Inflammation of the sheath of tissue that surrounds a tendon. Tenosynovitis is a common complication of animal bites containing anaerobic bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ihara, "Mycobacterium kansasii flexor tenosynovitis presenting as carpal tunnel syndrome," Journal of Hand Surgery, vol.
De Quervain's tenosynovitis (radial styloid tenosynovitis) involves painful inflammation of the 2 tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist--the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB).
(17) Staphylococcus species of bacteria are commonly implicated in cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in poultry; however, this is difficult to sample and culture reliably, because routine aerobic culture of joints experimentally injected with Staphylococcus species in dogs was shown to have false negative rates greater than 50% of the time.
(2011) studied that longitudinal tears (LTs) of digital flexor tendons are an important cause of chronic tenosynovitis of digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS).
Experimental inoculation of 1-week-old turkey poults with TARV via oral, intratracheal, and footpad routes resulted in histological lesions of gastrocnemius lymphocytic tenosynovitis at 4 weeks postinoculation (PI).
Studies using fat-saturated, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed soft tissue inflammation around the shoulder in addition to inflammation in the synovial tissues around the shoulder, such as tenosynovitis of the long head of biceps (LHB), subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis (SDB/SAB), and glenohumeral joint synovitis (GHJ), although no such inflammation in the extrasynovial soft tissues has been mentioned in previous studies employing US [7, 8].
Since the ultrasound results can be operator dependent and, as mentioned previously, the MRI is the technique of choice to evaluate PAIS, and tenosynovitis of the FHL sheath was also found on the ultrasound, we did not change our initial diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement caused by tenosynovitis of the FHL sheath.
Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (localised nodular tenosynovitis): clinicopathological features of 71 cases.
Erosive OA variably has additional features of synovitis, tenosynovitis and erosions (Figure 14) and is seen most frequently in postmenopausal females.
Of these, arthritis and spondylitis are the most frequent, whereas bursitis and tenosynovitis are exceptional (4).