tenosynovitis


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tenosynovitis

 [ten″o-sin″o-vi´tis]
inflammation of a tendon and its sheath, usually seen in the hands and wrists or feet and ankles; it is often the result of intense and continued use, as with pianists and typists. It is painful, and may temporarily disable the affected part. Rheumatoid and other types of arthritis frequently involve tendon sheaths. A less common cause of tenosynovitis is injury to the tendon sheath and subsequent infection. It can also be the result of tuberculous or gonorrheal infection. Treatment is by immobilization of the limb or, in severe cases, by surgery for the purpose of draining an infected sheath, or to release a tendon from a constricting sheath.
villonodular tenosynovitis a condition marked by exaggerated proliferation of synovial membrane cells, producing a solid tumorlike mass, commonly occurring in periarticular soft tissues and less frequently in joints.

ten·o·syn·o·vi·tis

(ten'ō-sin'ō-vī'tis),
Inflammation of a tendon and its enveloping sheath.
[teno- + synovia + G. -itis, inflammation]

tenosynovitis

/teno·syn·o·vi·tis/ (-sin″o-vi´tis) inflammation of a tendon sheath.
villonodular tenosynovitis  a condition marked by exaggerated proliferation of synovial membrane cells, producing a solid tumor-like mass, commonly occurring in periarticular soft tissues and less frequently in joints.

tenosynovitis

(tĕn′ō-sĭn′ə-vī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of a tendon sheath.

tenosynovitis

[ten′ōsin′əvī′tis]
Etymology: Gk, tenon, tendon, syn, together; L, ovum, egg; Gk, itis
inflammation of a tendon sheath caused by calcium deposits, repeated strain or trauma, high levels of blood cholesterol, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, or gonorrhea. In some instances, movement causes a crackling noise over the tendon. Most cases not associated with systemic disease respond to rest. Local injections of corticosteroids may provide relief; surgery is indicated if the condition persists. Also called tendosynovitis.
A digit with a focal fusiform swelling—due to oedema and/or inflammation—of the flexor tendon or tendon sheath which causes a painful lock-snap sensation, leaving the digit in flexion or extension. Trigger finger is most common in women in their sixth decade, and is associated with de Quervain’s disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, tenosynovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and connective tissue disease
Trigger finger in children Idiopathic, linked to chromosome defects, secondary to fractures, tendinous or ligamentous lesions

tenosynovitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of the tendon sheath and tendon, which may be caused by injury, overuse, strain, or, rarely, by infection. See Trigger finger.

ten·o·syn·o·vi·tis

(ten'ō-sin-ō-vī'tis)
Inflammation of a tendon and its enveloping sheath.
Synonym(s): tendinous synovitis, tendosynovitis, tendovaginitis, tenovaginitis.
[teno- + synovia + G. -itis, inflammation]

tenosynovitis

Inflammation of a tendon sheath, usually from overuse. There is pain, swelling, limitation of movement and a creaking sensation on movement of the tendon in its sheath. The condition is treated by rest, immobilization and injections of corticosteroid drugs around the affected tendon.

Tenosynovitis

Inflammation of the sheath of tissue that surrounds a tendon. Tenosynovitis is a common complication of animal bites containing anaerobic bacteria.

tenosynovitis

inflammation of the thin synovial lining of a tendon sheath, as distinct from its outer fibrous sheath. It may be caused by mechanical irritation or by bacterial infection.

tenosynovitis

inflammation of tendon and synovial sheath
  • acute simple synovitis traumatic synovitis; due to over-/unaccustomed use causing tendon and synovial sheath inflammation; characterized by pain/crepitus on movement, local swelling and tendon warmth; treated by rest, appropriate padding and strapping, orthoses, shoe advice (especially for tenosynovitis of extensor hallucis longus)

  • acute suppurative synovitis infected synovitis due to puncture of the tendon sheath (e.g. a 'spike' injury of tendo Achilles) or breakdown of tissue deep to a persistent corn (e.g. overlying prominent extensor hallucis longus tendon; characterized by acute infection (see sepsis); treated as an infected lesion (see Table 1) with systemic antibiosis

  • chronic simple synovitis; repetitive strain injury; RSI chronic inflammation of tendon/sheath (due to repetitive overuse), together with subserved muscle weakness/wasting; treated as chronic inflammation; note: cause must be established and resolved to achieve permanent resolution

Table 1: Treatment of local sepsis
MnemonicRationaleTreatment modality
OOperateRemove the cause of the infection where possible, e.g. remove focal hyperkeratosis/foreign body/nail spike
CCleanseIrrigate area/cleanse cavity with Warmasol delivered under pressure from a sterile syringe
HHeatAssist drainage of pus/exudate by applying heat, e.g. immersion in a warm hypertonic NaCl bath
AAntisepticApply a liquid or powder antiseptic (e.g. Betadine)
DDressCover the lesion with a sterile dressing (e.g. sterile gauze; Lyofoam)
RRestImpose rest, e.g. deflective padding; shoe modification; walking cast; crutches, as necessary
AReappointArrange to review case in 24-72 hours
RReviewAt the subsequent appointment, review progress
If resolution has been initiated, continue to treat as above (O-A) and review weekly until healing is complete
If the infection has not improved, arrange for antibiosis, and continue to review and dress until healing is complete
RReferRefer for specialist review via GP: remember, slow-to-resolve infection can characterize undiagnosed diabetes, or other 'at-risk' patient category

Use all normal preoperative procedures; keep infected lesions covered until ready to treat; take a swab for pathology laboratory analysis of any exudate; use a sterile dressings pack; follow the OCH-A-DRARR treatment mnemonic.

'At-risk' patients presenting with infection or patients presenting with acute or spreading infection should be treated using the OCH-A-DRARR protocol, but provided with or referred for immediate antibiosis.

tenosynovitis (teˈ·nō·siˈ·nō·vīˑ·tis),

n condition marked by inflammation of the synovial sheath that surrounds a tendon.

tenosynovitis (ten´ōsī´nəvī´tis),

n the inflammation of a tendon sheath caused by calcium deposits, repeated strain or trauma, high levels of blood cholesterol, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, or gonorrhea. Occasionally movement yields a crackling noise over the tendon.

tenosynovitis

inflammation of a tendon and its sheath, the lubricated layer of tissue in which the tendon is housed and through which it moves. It is painful, and may temporarily disable the affected part.
Arthritis frequently involves tendon sheaths. A less common cause of tenosynovitis is injury to the tendon sheath and subsequent infection.

villonodular tenosynovitis
a condition marked by exaggerated proliferation of synovial membrane cells, producing a solid tumor-like mass, may occur in periarticular soft tissues and less frequently in joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinically, it is important to understand the Kanavel signs as flexor tenosynovitis is a surgical emergency and should be diagnosed quickly and treated immediately.
Flexor tenosynovitis caused by Mycobacterium bovis: A case report.
25) The role of MRI in carpal tunnel syndrome is to exclude a potential cause for the symptoms, such as flexor tenosynovitis, or masses/cysts within the carpal tunnel.
As a result of brucella infection, sacroiliitis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis or bursitis may develop (1,2).
I see a lot more tenosynovitis cases here in the UAE because lots of people are on their BlackBerries," she said.
De Quervain's disease, caused by stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis), is probably the best known form of paratendinopathy of the wrist and hand and is approximately six times more common in women than in men (Maffulli et al.
Trigger wrist and flexor tenosynovitis J Hand Surg (Br) 1998 Dec; 23(6) 813-4
The treatments include different forms of dislocation, soft tissue injury, neck sprain, cervical vertebrae dislocation, acute lumbar sprain, prolapses of lumbar intervertebral disc, sciatica, lower back pain, periarthritis of shoulder (frozen shoulder), tennis elbow, tenosynovitis, myotenositis, different joint sprains, ligament tears, knee joint pathological changes, heel pain and different forms of muscle, bone and joint pain.
Description: This 62 page document reviews the evidence relating to carpel tunnel syndrome, non-specific arm pain, tenosynovitis, and lateral epicondylitis.
After just two appearances in April, Lahey was placed on the disabled list with what was inaccurately diagnosed as tenosynovitis, inflammation of the sheath surrounding a tendon.
2003b --repeated measures hypoalgesia effects from MWM applied to lateral epicondylalgia were maintained after repeated applications O'Brien & Case study To determine the Vincenzino, effectiveness of MWM applied 1998 at the ankle for acute lateral ankle pain Stephens, Case study NS 1995 Vincenzino & Case study To investigate effects of a Wright, 1995 manipulative PT technique on pain and dysfunction of a patient with tennis elbow Backstrom, Case report Introduce MWM in the 2002 treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis DeSantis & Case report To describe the effects of an Hasson, 2006 MWM treatment regime for shoulder impingement Folk, 2001 Case report To describe the differential diagnosis and treatment techniques for strained 1st MCP joint Hetherington, Case report NS.
The condition, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, occurred in the right hand of the female data clerk, who later developed associated depression.