tennis leg

ten·nis leg

a rupture of the gastrocnemius muscle at the musculotendinous junction, resulting from forcible contractions of the calf muscles; often seen in tennis players as the result of frequent quick stopping and starting movements.
Exercise-induced rupture of calf muscles that may occur following any violent exercise in which the rapidly moving body abruptly changes directions—e.g., tennis, soccer, downhill (alpine) skiing
Management Immobilisation in plantar flexion and physical therapy

tennis leg

Sports medicine Exercise-induced rupture of calf muscles that may occur following any violent exercise in which the rapidly moving body abruptly changes direction–eg, tennis, soccer, downhill–alpine skiing Clinical An audible snap may be heard in the popliteal space, accompanied by severe calf pain and hematoma, due to a rupture of the gastrocnemius Treatment Immobilization in plantar flexion and physical therapy
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References in periodicals archive ?
It imparted insights on different sports injuries, including elbow problems such as Tennis elbow and Golfer's elbow, Tennis leg, Achilles tendonitis, and their related management and mitigation techniques.
This particular injury is also known as a "tennis leg" calf injury and is widely known and extensively written about in literature [1].
The AP was, in fact, the only region to which the intrascar liquid had direct access; the epimysium of the muscles was intact so that the liquid could not accumulate either subcutaneously (a situation not uncommon in case of "tennis leg" injuries) or deeply, with respect to the Achilles tendon.
Giovagnorio, "US evaluation and diagnosis of rupture of the medial head of the gastrocnemius (tennis leg)," Journal of Ultrasound, vol.
Sharapova arrived in the Philippines Thurday night for the threeday tennis leg, which would start 4 p.m.
Muscle injuries in the calf are a relatively common clinical condition (1-6), and are also termed "tennis leg" in general because of the prevalence in that sport (3,7).
The tear of the gastrocnemius muscle is sometimes termed "tennis leg", due to its frequent occurrence in younger athletes involved in the sport.
This edition has about 20 new chapters on topics like ACL injuries, tennis leg, and heel pain; an expanded appendix on office rehabilitation; and new appendices on musculoskeletal radiography and joint and soft tissue injections.
Despite its small size, injuries of the plantaris muscle and tendon, which have been termed "tennis leg," have been a source of controversy in the literature.
The etiology of "tennis leg," and the existence of an isolated rupture of the plantaris muscle as the cause, has been debated since Powell first described this clinical condition in 1883.
Inspired by Wimbledon to get fit but you have tennis elbow - and tennis knee, tennis legs, and tennis back?
Certainly there is no-one hungrier than the 21-year-old Aussie, no-one who can touch his phenomenal work ethic, no-one who even gets close to the fastest tennis legs on the planet.