tennis leg

ten·nis leg

a rupture of the gastrocnemius muscle at the musculotendinous junction, resulting from forcible contractions of the calf muscles; often seen in tennis players as the result of frequent quick stopping and starting movements.
Exercise-induced rupture of calf muscles that may occur following any violent exercise in which the rapidly moving body abruptly changes directions—e.g., tennis, soccer, downhill (alpine) skiing
Management Immobilisation in plantar flexion and physical therapy

tennis leg

Sports medicine Exercise-induced rupture of calf muscles that may occur following any violent exercise in which the rapidly moving body abruptly changes direction–eg, tennis, soccer, downhill–alpine skiing Clinical An audible snap may be heard in the popliteal space, accompanied by severe calf pain and hematoma, due to a rupture of the gastrocnemius Treatment Immobilization in plantar flexion and physical therapy
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It imparted insights on different sports injuries, including elbow problems such as Tennis elbow and Golfer's elbow, Tennis leg, Achilles tendonitis, and their related management and mitigation techniques.
Sharapova arrived in the Philippines Thurday night for the threeday tennis leg, which would start 4 p.
This edition has about 20 new chapters on topics like ACL injuries, tennis leg, and heel pain; an expanded appendix on office rehabilitation; and new appendices on musculoskeletal radiography and joint and soft tissue injections.
3,4,5,6,7) Tennis leg is a relatively common clinical condition.
These findings suggest that the etiology of tennis leg can be caused by injury sustained by various tissues in isolation, or in combination.
Thus the literature demonstrates that injury to the plantaris muscle either on its own, or in combination with gastrocnemius, or soleus damage, can represent the cause of the clinical condition known as tennis leg.
Findings related to deep venous thrombosis in the calf can be mistaken for those of tennis leg and thus must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of clinical findings suggestive of this condition.
Although an there are no studies specifically looking at the treatment of plantaris injury, early literature on "nonspecific" tennis leg has stated that simple conservative treatment is effective, and that permanent disability rarely results.
Certainly there is no-one hungrier than the 21-year-old Aussie, no-one who can touch his phenomenal work ethic, no-one who even gets close to the fastest tennis legs on the planet.