tenesmus


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Related to tenesmus: toxic megacolon

tenesmus

 [tĕ-nez´mus]
ineffectual and painful straining at stool or urination. adj., adj tenes´mic.

te·nes·mus

(te-nez'mŭs),
A painful spasm of the urogenital diaphragm with an urgent desire to evacuate the bowel or bladder, involuntary straining, and the passage of little fecal matter or urine.
[G. teinesmos, ineffectual effort to defecate, fr. teinō, to stretch]

tenesmus

(tə-nĕz′məs)
n.
A painfully urgent but ineffectual attempt to urinate or defecate.

tenesmus

Painful spasm and productionless straining at stool

te·nes·mus

(tĕ-nez'mŭs)
A painful spasm of the anal sphincter with an urgent desire to evacuate the bowel or bladder, involuntary straining, and the passage of little fecal matter or urine.
[G. teinesmos, ineffectual effort to defecate, fr. teinō, to stretch]

tenesmus

A frequently recurring or continuous sense of wishing to empty the bowels. Tenesmus leads to ineffective straining and is a feature of the IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME, HAEMORRHOIDS, ULCERATIVE COLITIS, DYSENTERY, POLYPS in the RECTUM, PROLAPSE of the rectum and sometimes cancer of the rectum.

Tenesmus

Straining to urinate or defecate without being able to do so. Tenesmus is a characteristic feature of bacillary dysentery.
Mentioned in: Dysentery
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout the day, the observed frequency and severity of tenesmus decreased, hematochezia resolved, and the bird's appetite improved.
It's reported that cantharidin causes patient's hematochezia and tenesmus. Skin in touch with cantharidin causes mild irritation and inflammation [4].
It was contributed that the polypoid perimetrial lesions which were also extended along the uterine ligaments might induce ligament laxity and/or might act as an abdominal irritant leading to abdominal contractions or tenesmus in the mentioned case of uterine prolapse (Valentine et al., 2016).
A 62-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of vesical tenesmus without dysuria, vaginal bleeding, and low grade fever was referred to gynaecological and urological units.
The patient denied having any abdominal pain, dysuria, frequency, tenesmus, or some other urinary symptoms.
Although the majority of patients do not suffer from clinical symptoms, up to 40% of affected patients report clinical symptoms including mucous discharge, abdominal pain, bleeding, and tenesmus [1, 5, 23].
He did not have any episodes of vomiting, fever, altered bowel habits, tenesmus and bleeding per rectum.
Rectal infection can result in proctocolitis that can present with mucoid and/or hemorrhagic rectal discharge, anal pain, constipation, fever, and tenesmus, and signs of granulomas and/or ulcerations on anoscopy (1,2).
Patients 1 Pain (More than 7 03 05.7 at VAS Scale) 2 Haemorrhage 04 07.5 3 Retention of Urine 01 01.9 4 Prostatitis 01 01.9 5 Itching 01 01.9 6 Thrombosis 00 00.0 7 Vasovagal Shock 00 00.0 8 Tenesmus 00 00.0 9 Abscess Formation 00 00.0 10 Infertility 00 00.0 11 Allergic Reactions 00 00.0
The cyclic hematochezia was associated with low abdominal discomfort and tenesmus. The past surgical history of the patient was a laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy with right salpingo-oophorectomy for severe pelvic endometriosis with severe dysmenorrhea two years ago at another tertiary hospital.
A 73-year-old man with known diverticular disease presented to the surgical unit complaining of a two-year history of bladder fullness, difficult micturition and tenesmus. The investigation did not show a urinary tract or rectal cause for his symptoms.
Patients commonly present with symptoms of proctitis (i.e., rectal pain, discharge, bloody stools, constipation, and tenesmus) (1), although reports from the UK, the Netherlands, and Germany show that approximately one-third of LGV cases are asymptomatic (2).