tendon

(redirected from tendon of conus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

tendon

 [ten´don]
a cord or band of strong white fibrous tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. When the muscle contracts it pulls on the tendon, which moves the bone. Tendons are extremely tough and are seldom torn, even when an injury is severe enough to break a bone or tear a muscle. One of the most prominent tendons is the achilles tendon.
Frequently injured tendons. From Copstead, 1995.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]

tendon

(tĕn′dən)
n.
A band of tough, inelastic fibrous tissue that connects a muscle with its bony attachment.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]

tendon

A strong band of COLLAGEN fibres that joins muscle to bone or cartilage and transmits the force of muscle contraction to cause movement. Tendons are often provided with sheaths in which they move smoothly, lubricated by a fluid secreted by the sheath lining. Tendons may become inflamed, or may be torn or cut.

tendon

a bunch of parallel COLLAGEN fibres making up a band of CONNECTIVE TISSUE which serves to attach a muscle to a bone. The fibres become continuous with the collagen sheath around the muscle fibres and with the connective tissue covering the bone surface, making a strong cord with no weak connections.

Tendon

A tough cord of dense white fibrous connective tissue that connects a muscle with some other part, especially a bone, and transmits the force which the muscle exerts.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
Nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is part of muscles (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure.
[L. tendo]