tendon


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Related to tendon: Achilles tendon

tendon

 [ten´don]
a cord or band of strong white fibrous tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. When the muscle contracts it pulls on the tendon, which moves the bone. Tendons are extremely tough and are seldom torn, even when an injury is severe enough to break a bone or tear a muscle. One of the most prominent tendons is the achilles tendon.
Frequently injured tendons. From Copstead, 1995.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]

tendon

(tĕn′dən)
n.
A band of tough, inelastic fibrous tissue that connects a muscle with its bony attachment.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]

tendon

A strong band of COLLAGEN fibres that joins muscle to bone or cartilage and transmits the force of muscle contraction to cause movement. Tendons are often provided with sheaths in which they move smoothly, lubricated by a fluid secreted by the sheath lining. Tendons may become inflamed, or may be torn or cut.

tendon

a bunch of parallel COLLAGEN fibres making up a band of CONNECTIVE TISSUE which serves to attach a muscle to a bone. The fibres become continuous with the collagen sheath around the muscle fibres and with the connective tissue covering the bone surface, making a strong cord with no weak connections.

Tendon

A tough cord of dense white fibrous connective tissue that connects a muscle with some other part, especially a bone, and transmits the force which the muscle exerts.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
Nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is part of muscles (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure.
[L. tendo]
References in periodicals archive ?
These pathologies can cause degeneration or tendon tear of fibularis brevis muscle (Clarkson et al., 2013).
2006), the muscle was shown to have an accessory tendon and tripartite insertion.
A transosseous repair of the short head of the biceps tendon was performed utilizing an Arthrex BicepsButton[TM] (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, Florida, USA) after whip-stitching the raptured tendon with #2 FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc.), (Fig.
Tenya is regarded as the most successful Japanese tempura tendon chain with more than 200 stores across several Asian countries, mainly in Japan in the metropolitan Tokyo area.
La ruptura de tendon de Aquiles (RTA) es una lesion comun y frecuentemente producida por la actividad fisica en hombres durante decadas (1-4).
Tendon-bone interface with SVF-FG treatment formed a four-layer structure similar to the direct dead point, which successively includes the tendon, fibrocartilage, calcified cartilage, and bone tissue.
Patellar tendon stiffness was assessed using myotonometric measurements obtained with the Myoton Pro device (Myoton AS, Tallin, Estonia).
Studies established the need to apply viscoelastic agents that do not affect the healing process negatively and at the same time can also protect the gliding function of the tendon for successful tendon treatment.
Methods: Twenty four fresh frozen cadaver Achilles tendon specimens were collected and randomly divided into three groups (n=8), Group-A Bunnell suture method, Group-B Bosworth suture and Group-C anchor suture respectively.
(2007) showed that Achilles tendon compliance is optimized for muscle efficiency during prolonged running.