tender point


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

ten·der point

(ten'dĕr poynt)
Eighteen bilateral predefined areas in occiput, neck, shoulders, chest, elbows, gluteus, trochanter, and knees that produce painful response at 4 kg pressure; indicative of fibromyalgia if 11 of 18 test results are positive.
See also: fibromyalgia

tender point

One of the anatomic locations used to identify fibromyalgia. The deep diffuse muscular pain is localized to a number of reproducible (from patient to patient) areas that are tender when palpated. Tender points differ from trigger points in that pain does not radiate to referred areas.
See: fibromyalgia for table
See also: point
References in periodicals archive ?
Pain, on digital palpation, must be present in at least 11 of the following 18 tender point sites: Occiput: Bilateral, at the suboccipital muscle insertions.
These studies have shown that certain complaints, such as generalized muscular pain and tender points, are present in people with fibromyalgia and not commonly present in healthy people or people with other rheumatic conditions.
While eight of the people with CFS had no current musculoskeletal pain, the average tender point examination of the remaining 19 CFS patients was nearly identical to that of the fibromyalgia patients.
Relationships between the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, tender point count, and muscle strength in female patients with fibromyalgia: a cohort study.
The sum of PPT of 18 points for tender points, 12 points for the sciatic valleix, and 4 points for the lumbar paravertebrae were calculated separately as final scores in kg/[cm.
An audience member objected to eliminating the tender point exam.
Instead, the diagnosis has been made by a tender point test, a physical exam that focuses on 18 points throughout the body.
According to ACR criteria, a person is considered to have fibromyalgia if he or she has widespread pain for at least 3 months in combination with tenderness in at least 11 of 18 specific tender point sites.
He points out that some physicians may not have even heard of the tender point concept or various other indications of fibromyalgia.
Total myalgia score (TMS), which represented the severity of the clinical symptoms, was calculated by summing up total tender point count (TPC) and the tenderness score for each point, as determined on a 4-point scale (0= no tenderness, 1= mild tenderness, 2= moderate tenderness with grimace, 3= severe tenderness with flinch).
Alternative diagnostic criteria that do not require a tender point exam are being investigated for use in clinical practice.
This year the American College of Rheumatology published diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia that shifted the emphasis from tender point examination and focused instead on the other symptoms that cause misery in these patients, such as sleep disturbance and fatigue (Arthritis Care Res.