temporo-occipital

temporo-occipital

 [tem″po-ro-ok-sip´ĭ-tal]
pertaining to the temporal and occipital bones.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

temporo-occipital

(tĕm″pō-rō-ŏk-sĭp′ĭ-tăl) [″ + occipitalis, pert. to the occiput]
Pert. to the temporal and occipital bones of the skull or to the temporal and occipital lobes of the brain.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
On behalf of that majority of cases, AE did not correspond with SSC and temporo-occipital sulci participation is blamed in its formation with an inconstant fashion [5, 11].
Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed a sharp wave activity in the temporo-occipital and parieto-occipital regions of the left hemisphere also slowing of the ground rhythm in the posterior half of both hemispheres and temporal region of the left hemisphere.
One patient developed hemidystonia and hemichorea-hemiballism after bleeding of temporo-occipital AVM, and two patients had focal hemidystonia caused by hemorrhage from AVM in the basal ganglia.
This bundle, which connects the angular gyrus (AG) to the region of the temporo-occipital junction on the lateral surface, was considered the anterior and superficial edge to the occipital connectivity in our dissections.
On MRI brain, there were T2 hyperintensities in the right temporo-occipital and right posterior parietal regions.
Researchers identified five areas, in the frontal lobe and in the temporo-occipital region of the brain that were affected by frequent heading, areas that are responsible for attention, memory, executive functioning and higher-order visual functions.
In contrast, autoscopic hallucinations are correlated with damage to the temporo-occipital and parietal-occipital cortex, areas associated with visual processing, but lacking the vestibular input that could create a sensation that one is floating in space.
Only in one case the electroencephalogram was abnormal, with slow temporo-occipital waves observed.
Roland & Gulyas (1994) say that the areas used for visual imagery are parieto-occipital and temporo-occipital associative areas representing just a small sub-set of the visual areas involved in perception.
Both groups showed activation in the temporo-occipital cortex, but only BPD patients showed strong activation of the fusiform gyrus.