temporal muscle


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Related to temporal muscle: Masseter muscle

tem·po·ra·lis (mus·cle)

[TA]
superiormost masticatory muscle; origin, temporal fossa; insertion, coronoid process of mandible and anterior border of ramus; action elevates mandible (closes jaw); its posterior, nearly horizontally-oriented fibers are the primary retractors of the protruded mandible. nerve supply, deep temporal branches of mandibular division of trigeminal.

tem·po·ra·lis mus·cle

(tem-pŏr-ālis mŭsĕl)
Origin, temporal fossa; insertion, coronoid process of mandible and anterior border of ramus; action, elevates mandible (closes jaw); its posterior, nearly horizontally-oriented fibers are the primary retractors of the protruded mandible; nerve supply, deep temporal branches of mandibular division of trigeminal.
Synonym(s): musculus temporalis [TA] , temporal muscle.

tem·po·ra·lis mus·cle

(tem-pŏr-ālis mŭsĕl)
Origin, temporal fossa; insertion, coronoid process of mandible and anterior border of ramus; action, elevates mandible (closes jaw); its posterior, nearly horizontally-oriented fibers are the primary retractors of the protruded mandible; nerve supply, deep temporal branches of mandibular division of trigeminal.
Synonym(s): musculus temporalis [TA] , temporal muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The length of the origin and insertion of the temporal muscle (OriT and InsT) were greater in M.
The tumor was surrounded by the temporal muscle tendons, some of which approached the tumor.
Silverman, "Orbital reconstruction after exenteration: use of a transorbital temporal muscle flap," Annals of Plastic Surgery, vol.
For example, in the supraorbital keyhole approach, the incision is hidden in the eyebrows, and the bone window reaches the superciliary arch; in the subtemporal keyhole approach, the temporalis is separated and distracted to both sides to avoid the retraction of temporal muscle flap towards the temporal base in the conventional approach, and to prevent the surgical field from being blocked by the zygomatic arch.
The use of ultrasound and electromyography demonstrated the involvement of the masseter and temporal muscles [10,11].
The temporal muscle (Fig 1d) originating from the temporal fossa was a poor muscle according to the masseter muscle and surrounded the coronoid process laterally and medially.
Transfer of the temporal muscle for lagophthalmos according to Gillies.
In 1954, William Zenker published his findings referred to the description of a deep portion of the temporal muscle, called by some authors as sphenomandibular muscle (Dunn et al., 1996; Palomari et al, 2013).
The initial hypothesis assumed that the predominant activity of anterior temporal muscles would be observed in individuals with headache compared to individuals without any pain.
The defects were successfully repaired with temporal muscle fascia or fascia lata graft and fibrin glue using the middle cranial fossa approach via craniotomy.
For autogenous grafts, most surgeons prefer to use cartilage and fascia of the temporal muscle. Although cartilage tissue is mesenchymal in origin, it is thicker and more resistant to resorption and retraction than is temporal muscle fascia.
Surgical exploration revealed a smooth, capsulated mass, tightly jammed between the squamous bone and the temporal muscle. The tumor was completely excised.