distribution

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distribution

 [dis″trĭ-bu´shun]
1. the specific location or arrangement of continuing or successive objects or events in space or time.
2. the extent of a ramifying structure such as an artery or nerve and its branches.
3. the geographical range of an organism or disease.
frequency distribution in statistics, a mathematical function that describes the distribution of measurements on a scale for a specific population.
normal distribution a symmetrical distribution of scores with the majority concentrated around the mean; for example, that representing a large number of independent random events. It is in the shape of a bell-shaped curve. Called also gaussian distribution. See illustration.
 Normal distribution. The approximate percentage of the area (or frequency) lying under the curve between standard deviations is indicated. From Dorland's, 2000.
probability distribution a mathematical function that assigns to each measurable event in a sample group the probability that the event will occur.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn),
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations such as in different age, gender, or occupational samples.
4. Partition.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between organelles, cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. distribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

(dĭs′trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The extension of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The geographic occurrence or range of an organism.
4. A characterization of the occurrence of the actual unique values in a set of data (as in a frequency distribution) or of the theoretical unique values of a random variable (as in a probability distribution).

dis′tri·bu′tion·al adj.

distribution

Medspeak
The location or site of predilecton of a lesion or process.

Pharmacology
The reversible transfer of a drug from one site to another in the body.
 
Statistics
A group of ordered values; the frequencies or relative frequencies of all possible values of a characteristic.

distribution

Clinical medicine The pattern of involvement of a tissue by a particular condition. See Batwing distribution, Fat distribution, Mocassin distribution, Stocking & glove distribution Epidemiology The frequency and pattern of health-related characteristics and events in a population Pharmacology The location–eg intravascular or extravascular of a therapeutic agent after absorption, which corresponds to the sum of its distribution and elimination; disposition includes both the alpha and beta portions of a declining serum dose concentration versus time curve. See Disposition, Elimination.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. Passage of an agent through blood or lymph to body sites remote from the site(s) of contact and absorption; thus called systemic distribution.
4. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations, such as in different age, sex, or occupational samples.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

the occurrence of a species over the total area in which it occurs, i.e. its range or geographical distribution. In aquatic organisms or soil organisms, or even organisms living on mountains, vertical distribution is also important. In some organisms vertical distribution may vary seasonally, as does geographical distribution, particularly in migratory forms. See also FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSION.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. Passage of branches of arteries or nerves to tissues and organs.
2. Area in which branches of an artery or a nerve terminate or area supplied by such artery or nerve.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]
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Several studies to this point have considered the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall but assumed they were independent.
In the end, this study only explored the spatial and temporal distribution dynamics of the Yangtze finless porpoise at the confluence of the Yangtze and Wanhe Rivers.
The temporal distribution of outbreaks has also been depicted in Figure 2 that occurred during March 2006 and May 2007.
The temporal distribution of harvest within the season in Denmark indicated that the January extension accounted for roughly half of the entire harvest, strongly suggesting a growing hunting pressure as a result of the longer season.
The water pressure expression formula of high arch dam deformation spatial and temporal distribution model can be obtained.
The present study is therefore designed to investigate ranking order and temporal distribution of parturient haemoglobinuria in order to suggest future research priorities.
Temporal distribution of the 28 most abundant butterfly species (n > 10 individuals) in the Fazenda Agua Limpa and the Reserva Ecologica do Roncador (Brasilia, DF) in 4 climatic periods: wet, dry, transition from dry to wet (T.dw), and transition from wet to dry (T.wd).
Inflation has dropped to a nine-month low and despite the monsoon deficiency and its uneven spatial and temporal distribution, food inflation pressures have been contained by resolute actions by the government, he added.
The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal distribution of spinose ear tick abundance within animal shelters, examine the spatial dispersion of adult and larval ticks within animal shelters, and examine the effects of climatic variables on tick abundance.
Even basic information on their abundance, distribution, habitat requirements for optimal densities and spatial and temporal distribution of human- leopard conflict are not available.
In the first case, Bagnall shows that the lumpiness in the temporal distribution of certain types of documents can be traced to the circumstances of preservation and to the skewing effects of particular archival masses.

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