temperature scale


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scale

 [skāl]
1. a thin flake or compacted platelike body, as of cornified epithelial cells. See also squama.
2. a scheme or device by which some property may be measured (as hardness, weight, linear dimension).
3. to remove incrustations or other material from a surface, as from the enamel of teeth.
absolute scale (absolute temperature scale)
1. one with its zero at absolute zero (−273.15°C, −459.67°F).
ASIA scale a descriptive tool developed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) as a part of the complete classification of patients with spinal cord injuries. Called also Frankel Classification. See accompanying table.
Bayley S's of Infant Development a psychological test for assessing development of infants, using motor, mental, and behavioral developmental scales.
Borg scale a numerical scale for assessing dyspnea, from 0 representing no dyspnea to 10 as maximal dyspnea.
Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment scale a behavioral assessment scale used to evaluate the interactive behavior of a newborn by its responses to environmental stimuli.
Celsius scale (C) a temperature scale with zero at the freezing point of water and the normal boiling point of water at 100 degrees. The abbreviation 100°C should be read “one hundred degrees Celsius.” (For equivalents of Celsius and Fahrenheit temperatures, see Appendix.)
centigrade scale one with 100 gradations or steps between two fixed points, as the Celsius scale.
Fahrenheit scale (F) a temperature scale with the freezing point of water at 32 degrees and the normal boiling point of water at 212 degrees. The abbreviation 100°F should be read “one hundred degrees Fahrenheit.” (For equivalents of Fahrenheit and Celsius temperatures, see Appendix.)
French scale one used for denoting the size of catheters, sounds, and other tubular instruments, each French unit (symbol F) being approximately 0.33 mm in diameter.
Glasgow Coma scale a standardized system for assessing response to stimuli in a neurologically impaired patient, assessing eye opening, verbal response, and motor ability. Reaction scores are depicted in numerical values, thus minimizing the problem of ambiguous and vague terms to describe the patient's neurologic status. (See accompanying Table.) The total score is obtained by adding E, M, and V; a score of 7 or less indicates coma and a score of 9 or more rules out coma.
Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale a hundred-point scale used as axis V of DSM-IV to assess a client's recent and current levels of social, psychological, and occupational functioning.
gray scale a representation of intensities in shades of gray, as in gray-scale ultrasonography.
interval scale a scale having equal numerical distances between intervals in addition to mutually exclusive categories, exhaustive categories, and rank ordering but no zero point.
Karnofsky scale (Karnofsky performance scale) a widely used performance scale, assigning scores ranging from 0 for a nonfunctional or dead patient to 100 for one with completely normal functioning.
Kelvin scale an absolute scale in which the unit of measurement, the kelvin, corresponds to that of the Celsius scale; therefore the ice point is at 273.15 kelvins.
Likert scale a tool used to determine opinions or attitudes; it contains a list of declarative statements, each followed by a scale on which the subject is to indicate degrees of intensity of a given feeling.
Neonatal Behavior Assessment scale Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale.
performance scale a scale that measures a patient's performance status, serving as a prognostic indicator of seriousness of disease or disability. The most widely used scale is the Karnofsky scale.
Problem Rating scale for Outcomes see problem rating scale for outcomes.
semantic differential scale a measurement device that consists of two opposite adjectives with a seven-point scale between them; each item under examination is assigned to a specific point on the scale.
temperature scale one for expressing degree of heat, based on absolute zero as a reference point, or with a certain value arbitrarily assigned to such temperatures as the ice point and boiling point of water.

temperature scale

a scale for expressing degree of heat, based on absolute zero as a reference point, or with a certain value arbitrarily assigned to such temperatures as the freezing point and boiling point of water.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there were certain aspects that made me curious about trying to design a different temperature scale.
As the temperature scale is imported to METROSERT by calibration of the SPRTs at other laboratories, the resistance value at the TPW is checked before the SPRTs are shipped for calibration and after the SPRTs have returned from calibration.
Producing the evidence version of the Kelvin temperature scale requires translating thermodynamics math into analogous equations for evidence.
Being familiar with the recent development of the first law, he discovered and corrected the error due to the caloric theory, which led him to his discovery of an absolute temperature scale.
Its experimental determination is rather cumbersome procedure, that's why it would be rational to determine mentioned [beta] within narrow range (15-50 degrees) on the temperature scale.
The temperature scale of DSC was calibrated with indium.
And schools are able to keep the computer labs on the same temperature scale as the rest of the school, rather than spend additional money to cool the labs because of the heat desktop computers emit.
Different image modes are available on the colour LCD screen, and the temperature scale can be user-set to a range from -50[degrees]C to 1000[degrees]C.
NIST staff recently completed work on Key Comparison 3 of the Consultative Committee on Thermometry (CCT-K3), which compares realizations of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) over the industrially important temperature range -189 [degrees]C to 660 [degrees]C.
First, the temperature response for thermocouples is nonlinear across the temperature scale.
It's impossible to compare temperature readings without establishing a universal temperature scale, and scientists fought for centuries about what that scale should be.

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