inversion

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inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
References in periodicals archive ?
Research has shown that surface-based SHUM inversions are accompanied by temperature inversions 70% of the time, which then increase to 90% in the direction of the continent's interior (grid E), while in Western Europe, they do not exceed 60%.
We will present two characteristic measurements here: one during the day without any temperature inversion, and other when the thermal stratification was strong.
The results show that the temperature inversion during the course of study in Tehran has been settled in all seasons and due to qualification the inversion conditions, the temperature sustainability of earth surface has been settled and 80 percent of the days of four years was studied under dominant inversion conditions, but height of the layer of inversion varies according to changing the seasons, and the greatest circumference of the inversion has been in autumn and winter according to maps of Skew-T.
Our study examined the associations between peak SARS incidences at Amoy Gardens and the maximum and minimum temperatures, wind speed, wind direction, and heights of temperature inversion bases six days before, and the article discusses possible implications.
The mean elevation of the top of the wintertime temperature inversion has decreased from about 1900 m ASL in the late 1950s to 1200 m ASL in 2001-05.
To allow a more consistent comparison of temperature inversion results, a standardization of surface temperature reconstruction is needed.
During severe winter temperature inversions, the mill contributes 50-70 percent of total [PM.sub.10] pollution (Utah Bureau of Air Quality, 1990).
In the Sisters area, calm conditions and temperature inversions are keeping heavy smoke at ground level between midnight and noon of each day, pushing the air quality to the "hazardous" level at those times, the state noted.
It poses specific challenges during the summer months, when temperature inversions occur along coastlines, resulting in sea breezes--basically, mini-cold fronts that move inland, and can be mistaken by a radar for actual precipitation.
The team determined the best indicators of environmental changes due to climate change are quantity of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality (in particular ozone), air mass stagnation events (such as those caused by temperature inversions), temperature and humidity, pollen loads, ragweed occurrence, drought incidence, drinking water scarcity, and occurrence of wildfires and harmful algal blooms.
The results include a better and more extensive selection of station data, use of satellite imagery to gain knowledge of temperature inversions, improvement of the interpolation method to recognize and correct misleading climatelevation relationships produced by sparse data, and development of storm trajectory and coastal proximity models.

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