temperate phage


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temperate phage

a BACTERIOPHAGE which may become a PROPHAGE by integrating with the host DNA or being extrachromosomal, and establishing LYSOGENY. The phage may also be capable of intracellular development within the host, and of causing LYSIS in the LYTIC CYCLE. An example is bacteriophage lambda. Compare VIRULENT PHAGE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Temperate phage, such as P1, have the ability to exist within the bacterial cell they infect in two different ways.
Typically, only lytic phages are exploited for phage therapy: firstly, because they kill the host bacteria in a more efficient manner; subsequently because, after lysogenic induction, temperate phages can transfer bacteria DNA fragments to other species, and if these fragments contain gene-encoding toxins or antibiotic resistance elements, they could generate new dangerous bacteria.
As the phage filtrates were not purified, more species of phages may have been present, including temperate phages that did not lyse the bacteria or virulent phages with longer latency periods and therefore did not have the time to produce plaques during the 24 h incubation period.