temperament

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Related to temperaments: choleric

temperament

 [tem´per-ah-ment]
an inherent, constitutional predisposition to react to stimuli in a certain way; the term is often used synonymously with personality. Compare character.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-ă-mĕnt),
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the individual, specifically, an individual's pervasive and characteristic manner of perceiving, thinking, and acting. It represents one component of personality, the other is character.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1)
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

temperament

(tĕm′prə-mənt, tĕm′pər-ə-)
n.
1. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person.
2. Disposition; temper.

temperament

[temp′(ə)rəmənt]
Etymology: L, temperamentum, mixture in proper proportions
the features of a persona that reflect an individual's emotional disposition, or the way he or she behaves, feels, and thinks.

temperament

Psychology An inborn pattern of behavior that tends to remain constant throughout life; a constitutional predisposition to react in a particular way to stimuli. See Artistic temperament, Temper. Cf Personality.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-mĕnt)
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the person, including one's character or personality predispositions, which influence the manner of thought and action and general views of life.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1) .
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

Temperament

A person's natural or genetically determined disposition.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders

temperament

the peculiar behavioral character and mental cast of an animal.

temperament change
can be important in animal management or indicative of disease, e.g. vicious change in mare with ovarian adenocarcinoma, assumption of male characters in cow with ovarian tumor, disengagement in dogs with brain tumor. In food animals, castration of male livestock and spaying of females is practiced to aid management with limited restraint. In companion animals desexing practiced for population control also has marked effect on temperament.
References in classic literature ?
His imagination invested her with the taste for the fine arts which ho required from a wife, and he married her in her first season, only to discover that the amativeness in her temperament was so little and languid that she made all his attempts at fondness ridiculous, and robbed the caresses for which he had longed of all their anticipated ecstasy.
A work of art is the unique result of a unique temperament.
His sanguine temperament was disclosed in the deep color of his cheeks.
Though his temperament was lymphatic, the devout Isidore was under the influence of a conjugal passion which time did not lessen.
With that settled resolution, and steadiness of purpose to which extreme circumstances so often give birth, acting upon far less excitable and more sluggish temperaments than that which was the lot of Madeline Bray's admirer, Nicholas started, at dawn of day, from the restless couch which no sleep had visited on the previous night, and prepared to make that last appeal, by whose slight and fragile thread her only remaining hope of escape depended.
Lastly, it was also here that I have felt the soothing influence that religion sheds over the wounds of humanity, and (without going further into the subject) I have seen how admirably it is suited to the fervid temperaments of southern races.
I suppose no woman could have been further in person, voice, and temperament from Dumas' appealing heroine than the veteran actress who first acquainted me with her.
Some among them thought it was on account of her false hair, or the dread of getting the violets wet, while others attributed it to the natural aversion for water sometimes believed to accompany the artistic temperament.
By the involuntary effect of a genial temperament, Phoebe soon grew to be absolutely essential to the daily comfort, if not the daily life, of her two forlorn companions.
Old Roger Chillingworth, throughout life, had been calm in temperament, kindly, though not of warm affections, but ever, and in all his relations with the world, a pure and upright man.
Miss Marrable, whose temperament was sensitive, became hysterical under the strain of perpetual anxiety; the family doctor declined to answer for the nervous consequences if something was not done.
That was all I knew of Nicolete's parents, and all I needed to know; with the exception of one good action,--at her urgent entreaty they had left Nicolete behind them, with no other safeguard than a charming young lady companion, whose fitness for her sacred duties consisted in a temperament hardly less romantic and whimsical than Nicolete's own.