temperament

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Related to temperamentally: vindictiveness, unhinging

temperament

 [tem´per-ah-ment]
an inherent, constitutional predisposition to react to stimuli in a certain way; the term is often used synonymously with personality. Compare character.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-ă-mĕnt),
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the individual, specifically, an individual's pervasive and characteristic manner of perceiving, thinking, and acting. It represents one component of personality, the other is character.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1)
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

temperament

(tĕm′prə-mənt, tĕm′pər-ə-)
n.
1. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person.
2. Disposition; temper.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

temperament

Psychology An inborn pattern of behavior that tends to remain constant throughout life; a constitutional predisposition to react in a particular way to stimuli. See Artistic temperament, Temper. Cf Personality.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-mĕnt)
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the person, including one's character or personality predispositions, which influence the manner of thought and action and general views of life.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1) .
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Temperament

A person's natural or genetically determined disposition.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are "temperamentally unsuited." That dispensed with, I must have a bit of fun with you and Steve Forbes on the Smoot-Hawley Tariff.
LBJ least of all wanted to be a war president, but it was his misfortune to inherit a war that was probably unwinnable and that, by his own admission, he was ill-prepared temperamentally to conduct.
I'm not temperamentally inclined to behave that way, although I do appreciate simple professional courtesies, such as seats being held and so on.
'For Bika I wasn't right temperamentally and I struggled.
Nicknamed "le notaire" (the notary) for his immaculate attention to his appearance, Seurat was temperamentally suited for a scientific approach to art (3).
Instead, they are redirected to Minnesota, where "Papa's family rejects them with no explanation about his whereabouts." In Tar Town, a bleak settlement for Italian immigrants, Mama becomes withdrawn and temperamentally unable to express affection towards her children.
The translators argue in their introduction that Sand was 'inherently, and temperamentally, as much a dramatist as a novelist' (p.
Only for some (intellectually informed and temperamentally predisposed), the playsome (as an act of culture, cf.
There is no "clash of civilizations" because there are no clear-cut, and certainly no temperamentally homogeneous, civilizations to do the clashing.
Williams: Temperamentally a time-bomb but works hard to keep her emotions in check (9).
The results indicated that children who frequently, as compared to their peers, engaged in solitary-active behaviors were temperamentally less attentive, more difficult to soothe, and shier; they displayed more externalizing problems, performed more poorly on assessments of early academic skills, and had a less positive attitude towards school.