temperament

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Related to temperamentally: vindictiveness, unhinging

temperament

 [tem´per-ah-ment]
an inherent, constitutional predisposition to react to stimuli in a certain way; the term is often used synonymously with personality. Compare character.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-ă-mĕnt),
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the individual, specifically, an individual's pervasive and characteristic manner of perceiving, thinking, and acting. It represents one component of personality, the other is character.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1)
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

temperament

(tĕm′prə-mənt, tĕm′pər-ə-)
n.
1. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person.
2. Disposition; temper.

temperament

[temp′(ə)rəmənt]
Etymology: L, temperamentum, mixture in proper proportions
the features of a persona that reflect an individual's emotional disposition, or the way he or she behaves, feels, and thinks.

temperament

Psychology An inborn pattern of behavior that tends to remain constant throughout life; a constitutional predisposition to react in a particular way to stimuli. See Artistic temperament, Temper. Cf Personality.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-mĕnt)
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the person, including one's character or personality predispositions, which influence the manner of thought and action and general views of life.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1) .
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

Temperament

A person's natural or genetically determined disposition.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders

temperament

the peculiar behavioral character and mental cast of an animal.

temperament change
can be important in animal management or indicative of disease, e.g. vicious change in mare with ovarian adenocarcinoma, assumption of male characters in cow with ovarian tumor, disengagement in dogs with brain tumor. In food animals, castration of male livestock and spaying of females is practiced to aid management with limited restraint. In companion animals desexing practiced for population control also has marked effect on temperament.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nicola Roberts, a fine current Ashton interpreter, who came through the school at a time when the teaching was purely British and she could watch the Ashton dancers in the company, feels temperamentally attuned to his work: "It's a natural thing.
Combining critical inquiry and ethical concern, it now encompasses those areas that concern all naturalistic humanists, whatever camp they identify with temperamentally - secular, religious, or just plain humanist.
They are temperamentally unable to survive in the environment that a manager faces.
Somewhere along the way we drifted, both temperamentally explosive we clashed.
Unlike the flamboyant Galliano, who ended each runway show with a flourish of theatricality, Simons is temperamentally more restrained, although he did have tears in his eyes when he presented his last show for Sander in Milan in February, the LA Times reported.
This election is going to be about the character of two men, so voters will be asked to decide whether David Cameron is psychologically, temperamentally and emotionally better equipped than Mr Brown to be PM.
Actor Clint Eastwood "I am temperamentally unsuited for such a role.
A very small number have died of natural causes or have been put to sleep on veterinary advice, for health reasons or because they are temperamentally unsuitable for rehoming.
Few understand Murray's predicament better than GB captain John Lloyd (below), who often teamed up with his brother David in Davis Cup ties, even though temperamentally they could be as different as fire and ice.
He consistently produces temperamentally docile offspring with great muscular skeletal development, superior length and hindquarter development with correct locomotion.
Not even Dudamel's temperamentally attuned grasp of the Sinfonia India by the Mexican Carlos Chavez, nor the orchestra's brilliant and generous response could redeem this clunky piece.
Her modest set-piece arrangements--featuring tiny barnyard animals emitting speech bubble baas and brays; small groves of flora made from string, wire, plastic sheeting and pipe-cleaners; nursery-school wallpaper; and puffy white clouds more suggestive of cotton candy than cumulonimbus--were temperamentally sweet enough to set the average visitor's teeth on edge.