temperament

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Related to temperamentally: vindictiveness, unhinging

temperament

 [tem´per-ah-ment]
an inherent, constitutional predisposition to react to stimuli in a certain way; the term is often used synonymously with personality. Compare character.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-ă-mĕnt),
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the individual, specifically, an individual's pervasive and characteristic manner of perceiving, thinking, and acting. It represents one component of personality, the other is character.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1)
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

temperament

(tĕm′prə-mənt, tĕm′pər-ə-)
n.
1. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person.
2. Disposition; temper.

temperament

[temp′(ə)rəmənt]
Etymology: L, temperamentum, mixture in proper proportions
the features of a persona that reflect an individual's emotional disposition, or the way he or she behaves, feels, and thinks.

temperament

Psychology An inborn pattern of behavior that tends to remain constant throughout life; a constitutional predisposition to react in a particular way to stimuli. See Artistic temperament, Temper. Cf Personality.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-mĕnt)
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the person, including one's character or personality predispositions, which influence the manner of thought and action and general views of life.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1) .
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

Temperament

A person's natural or genetically determined disposition.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders

temperament

the peculiar behavioral character and mental cast of an animal.

temperament change
can be important in animal management or indicative of disease, e.g. vicious change in mare with ovarian adenocarcinoma, assumption of male characters in cow with ovarian tumor, disengagement in dogs with brain tumor. In food animals, castration of male livestock and spaying of females is practiced to aid management with limited restraint. In companion animals desexing practiced for population control also has marked effect on temperament.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no "clash of civilizations" because there are no clear-cut, and certainly no temperamentally homogeneous, civilizations to do the clashing.
Williams: Temperamentally a time-bomb but works hard to keep her emotions in check (9).
The results indicated that children who frequently, as compared to their peers, engaged in solitary-active behaviors were temperamentally less attentive, more difficult to soothe, and shier; they displayed more externalizing problems, performed more poorly on assessments of early academic skills, and had a less positive attitude towards school.
Some people are temperamentally unsuited for mentoring.
So although he was an important creative force in his own practice, as well as an important procurer of clients, Casson was never really suited temperamentally to the hard slog of architecture.
The story is dense and based on the unfounded notion that the Ripper was a member of the Royal household; however, Plummer is particularly effective (if temperamentally wrong) as Holmes, and Mason gives what is perhaps the best screen performance of Dr.
Like Pearl, Mississippi, and West Paducah, Kentucky, other towns hit with schoolyard killings, Jonesboro is located both physically and temperamentally in the Bible Belt.
Anxious to accommodate others and temperamentally indisposed to moral controversy and disagreement, the moral chameleon is quick to modify or abandon previously avowed principles.
They are wonderfully sympathetic partners, in sync physically, musically, and temperamentally.
The analyses themselves are not uniformly convincing or penetrating, while much of the technical writing concerning Harrison's obsession with intonational systems other than equal temperament will be lost on all but the most mathematically minded (or temperamentally inclined) readers.
When we differ--and as humanists we are temperamentally given to differing--we turn our differences into reasons for apartness.
An intelligent and talented staff officer, Gamelin was not temperamentally suited to supreme command; although five years younger than Weygand, he reacted slowly and hesitantly in spring 1940, and failed to provide the leadership needed in that crisis.