temperament

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temperament

 [tem´per-ah-ment]
an inherent, constitutional predisposition to react to stimuli in a certain way; the term is often used synonymously with personality. Compare character.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-ă-mĕnt),
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the individual, specifically, an individual's pervasive and characteristic manner of perceiving, thinking, and acting. It represents one component of personality, the other is character.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1)
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

temperament

(tĕm′prə-mənt, tĕm′pər-ə-)
n.
1. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person.
2. Disposition; temper.

temperament

Psychology An inborn pattern of behavior that tends to remain constant throughout life; a constitutional predisposition to react in a particular way to stimuli. See Artistic temperament, Temper. Cf Personality.

tem·per·a·ment

(tem'pĕr-mĕnt)
1. The psychological and biologic organization peculiar to the person, including one's character or personality predispositions, which influence the manner of thought and action and general views of life.
2. Synonym(s): temper (1) .
[L. temperamentum, proper measure, moderation, disposition]

Temperament

A person's natural or genetically determined disposition.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
The more temperamental animals continued to act high-strung and flighty after the endotoxin challenge.
Firstly, anger/frustration or temperamental anger is a characteristic trait of children who are easily annoyed when they do not get what they want (Rothbart et al., 1994).
Gill Bazeley with (standing, from left) Craig Skinner, Janelle Grant and Nicolette Bazeley, and (front) Ross Fleming, Lily Whiting and Christina Warmington, and (inset) the temperamental old boiler.
The temperamental Frenchman swopped the grind of a relegation dogfight with Portsmouth for the glamour of Champions League football by signing on a free transfer.
Harlan's personal eye-witness story begins in the summer of 1942 at MacDill Field, Tampa, Florida where the pilots first learned to master their temperamental B-26 bombers.
But her biggest claim to fame was in the role of the temperamental nightclub owner Clare Bridgeman on daytime TV's "Love of Life" from 1967-70.
Here, however, the taut, muscular streak of the Central Building (no slip at 40 000sqm) is dwarfed by the grey hangars of industrial production, like burly minders clustering round a potentially temperamental film star.
The duo - Tracey and long-term boyfriend Ben Watt - last released a studio album, Temperamental, six years ago.
MY PROFESSIONAL MOONLIT CAREER as a recording guy was really over before it started, before I'd ever threaded a reel of Ampex 456 onto an old, temperamental Tascam 388.
Designed to tame the temperamental shrink wrap process, the SW-2000 belt-infeed and SW-3000 flight-lug machines feature intuitive setup based on package dimensions, along with on-the-fly tracking adjustments and side-seal/cross-seal systems that never need cleaning.
That grief was at times seen as temperamental rather than circumstantial in origin is the focus of Lange's "Humourous Grief: Donne and Burton Read Melancholy." She reviews the work of period commentators on melancholy, finding that by the Jacobean era such symptoms were regarded by Burton and others as more mental than physical.
The notion of temperamental, bad-tempered culinary geniuses storming around the kitchen with a meat clever is clearly nonsense.