telomere


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telomere

 [tel´o-mēr]
an extremity of a chromosome, which has specific properties, one of which is a polarity that prevents reunion with any fragment after a chromosome has been broken.

tel·o·mere

(tel'ō-mēr),
The distal end of a chromosome arm.
[G. telos, end, + meros, part]

telomere

(tĕl′ə-mîr′, tē′lə-)
n.
Either of the sections of DNA occurring at the ends of a chromosome.

tel·o·mere

(tel'ō-mēr)
The distal end of a chromosome arm; telomeres undergo dramatic changes during the progression of cancer.
[G. telos, end, + meros, part]

telomere

region at the ends of EUKARYOTIC CHROMOSOMES, enabling the cell to distinguish between natural ends and unnatural ends, caused by chromosome breakage. The telomeric DNA comprises of hundreds of copies of a repeated sequence, to which specific proteins, called ‘telomere binding proteins’ (TBPs) bind to regulate the length of the chromosome.
References in periodicals archive ?
A research review published in The Journals of Gerontology reports that telomeres can react positively to healthy lifestyle choices, so you can influence their health.
Since researchers discovered telomeres, they've linked their shortening to many health issues.
However, when they do not work properly, telomeres can lead to the total erosion of genetic material and can trigger cancer and age-related diseases.
But researchers have also found that telomeres are mutable.
"Shorter leukocyte telomere lengths may represent a clinically translatable biomarker for identifying individuals at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes in COPD."
'Overall, the findings suggest that following these guidelines is associated with longer telomere length and reduces the risk of major chronic disease.'
A study conducted before and after the 2004 closure of a coal-burning power plant in Tongliang, China, found children born before the closure had shorter telomeres than those conceived and born after the plant stopped polluting the air, Medicalxpress reported.
Telomeres are chains of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that protect chromosomes during cell division.
The research found that individuals with a history of alcohol abuse had shorter telomeres, a sign that their cells may be aging faster than an individual of the same age without this history.
A team of researchers led by Dr Dennis Kappei, a Special Fellow from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS), has discovered the role of the protein ZBTB48 in regulating both telomeres and mitochondria, which are key players involved in cellular ageing.
After extracting chromosomes from the patients' cancer cells, the researchers measured telomere length in each sample using a technology they had previously developed called Single Telomere Length Analysis (STELA).
Young people with asthma also have evidence of telomere shortening, according to the preliminary research by John R.