tellurium


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tellurium

 [tĕ-lu´re-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 52, atomic weight 127.60, symbol Te. (See Appendix 6.)

tel·lu·ri·um (Te),

(tel-ū'rē-ŭm),
A rare semimetallic element, atomic no. 52, atomic wt. 127.60, belonging to the sulfur group.
[L. tellus (tellur-), the earth]

tellurium

A rare, toxic metalloid element (atomic number 52; atomic weight 127.60) that may combine with organic molecules to form organotelluriums, which may have antibacterial and, some believe, anticarcinogenic effects.

tel·lu·ri·um

(tĕ-lūr'ē-ŭm)
A rare semimetallic element, atomic no. 52, atomic wt. 127.60, belonging to the sulfur group.
[L. tellus (tellur-), the earth]
References in periodicals archive ?
Selenium and tellurium produce lower MH, lower modulus, lower hardness and higher solvent swell.
These thin films clearly indicate that the tellurium and bismuth grow on Si substrate in spherical granular shape and the large granular clusters have appeared as the magnification increases [10].
Subramanian, "Extractive separation of selenium and tellurium using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride," Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan, vol.
[12], who stated that for deposition temperatures beyond 500[degrees]C, the rhombohedral phase of the oxide [Fe.sub.2][O.sub.3] appears and prevents the substitution of oxygen by tellurium.
The identification of tellurium molecular and cellular targets is highly desirable from toxicological, physiological, and biochemical point of view.
Figure 4 shows images of selenium electrodes with and without tellurium, as well as before and after annealing.
Selenium and Tellurium solution were prepared by dissolving the respective oxides in distilled water and standardized 8.
JetGold is a Canadian resource exploration company actively developing gold, silver, copper, zinc, molybdenum and tellurium mineral resource properties in British Columbia, Canada.
The report estimates that it will take 400 metric tons of tellurium, twice 2009's total output, to make enough solar cells to generate 1 gigawatt of electrical power.
Also, solar depends on tellurium solar panels, and China has the world's only tellurium mine.
On the list are such elements as lithium in automotive batteries for electric vehicles; rare-earth elements in compact-fluorescent light bulbs and in permanent magnets for wind turbines; and cadmium, indium, and tellurium in photovoltaic solar cells.
But neither cadmium nor tellurium is included in the list of rare earth elements that Europe or the Chinese have developed.