POTS

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Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome. A form of dysautonomia characterised by orthostatic intolerance and defined by tachycardia when assuming a standing or upright position and a marked decreased in cerebral blood flow and pressure, resulting in fatigue, lightheadedness, syncope, visual defects and disorientation, as well as systemic hypoperfusion, resulting in Raynaud phenomenon, chest pain dyspnea, asthenia and general malaise. Because the symptoms overlap those of generalised anxiety disorder, POTS may be diagnosed as such
Management Increase liquid intake, decrease alcohol, exercise regularly

postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

,

POTS

Inability to tolerate a standing position as a result of a sudden increase in heart rate when rising from a seated or recumbent position. It is thought to be one of the dysautonomic syndromes.
References in classic literature ?
"I should judge it about time to telephone for the police."
"There's a telephone installed for the purpose," said Raffles.
It was daybreak when I gave the alarm with bell and telephone. In a few minutes we had the house congested with dishevelled domestics, irascible doctors, and arbitrary minions of the law.
You may remember that he telephoned to his man to prepare supper for us, and that you and he discussed telephones and treasure as we marched through the midnight streets.
"Ah!" She applied her ear to the telephone once more.
If you don't go tonight, I'll never speak to you again, even on the telephone. Promise.'
Already, for half a year or longer, Bell had known the correct theory of the telephone; but he had not realized that the feeble undulatory current generated by a magnet was strong enough for the transmission of speech.
And the third of these speech-improving Bells, the inventor of the telephone, inherited the peculiar genius of his fathers, both inventive and rhetorical, to such a degree that as a boy he had constructed an artificial skull, from gutta-percha and India rubber, which, when enlivened by a blast of air from a hand-bellows, would actually pronounce several words in an almost human manner.
The third Bell, the only one of this remarkable family who concerns us at this time, was a young man, barely twenty-eight, at the time when his ear caught the first cry of the telephone. But he was already a man of some note on his own account.
Now, Helmholtz had not been trying to invent a telephone, nor any sort of message-carrier.
Hubbard--to become Bell's chief spokesman and defender, a true apostle of the telephone.
It was one of the most extraordinary incidents in the whole history of the telephone. To an uninitiated onlooker, nothing could have been more ghastly or absurd.