POTS

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Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome. A form of dysautonomia characterised by orthostatic intolerance and defined by tachycardia when assuming a standing or upright position and a marked decreased in cerebral blood flow and pressure, resulting in fatigue, lightheadedness, syncope, visual defects and disorientation, as well as systemic hypoperfusion, resulting in Raynaud phenomenon, chest pain dyspnea, asthenia and general malaise. Because the symptoms overlap those of generalised anxiety disorder, POTS may be diagnosed as such
Management Increase liquid intake, decrease alcohol, exercise regularly

postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

,

POTS

Inability to tolerate a standing position as a result of a sudden increase in heart rate when rising from a seated or recumbent position. It is thought to be one of the dysautonomic syndromes.
References in classic literature ?
It was one of the most extraordinary incidents in the whole history of the telephone.
In a flash the conception of a membrane telephone was pictured in his mind.
If you wish my daughter," said Hubbard, "you must abandon your foolish telephone.
For exactly three months after his interview with Professor Henry, he continued to plod ahead, along both lines, until, on that memorable hot afternoon in June, 1875, the full TWANG of the clock-spring came over the wire, and the telephone was born.
The telephone was now in existence, but it was the youngest and feeblest thing in the nation.
For forty weeks--long exasperating weeks-- the telephone could do no more than gasp and make strange inarticulate noises.
There's a telephone installed for the purpose," said Raffles.
It was daybreak when I gave the alarm with bell and telephone.
You may remember that he telephoned to his man to prepare supper for us, and that you and he discussed telephones and treasure as we marched through the midnight streets.
Mary crossed to the telephone and, after a series of brief remarks, announced:
One morning, receiving from one of the bank messengers the usual intimation that a lady wished to speak to him on the telephone, he went to the box and took up the receiver.
If you don't go tonight, I'll never speak to you again, even on the telephone.