telemedicine


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telemedicine

 [tel″ĕ-med´ĭ-sin]
a branch of telehealth consisting of provision of consultant services by off-site health care professionals to those on the scene; diagnosis and treatment can be done at a great distance through methods such as the videoconference or rapid transmission of digital files.

telemedicine

(tĕl′ĭ-mĕd′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
The use of telecommunications technology to provide, enhance, or expedite health care services, as by accessing offsite databases, linking clinics or physicians' offices to central hospitals, or transmitting x-rays or other diagnostic images for examination at another site.

tel′e·med′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

telemedicine

Informatics
Any form of medical practice in which diagnostic information (e.g., telecytology, telemetry, telemicroscopy, telepathology, or teleradiology) is transmitted for analysis by a physician, who performs teleconsultation; telemedicine focuses on provider aspects of healthcare telecommunications, especially medical imaging. This includes the use of electronic media to communicate between patients and clinicians or between clinicians on more than one site.

Main types
Store and forward (e.g., email picture as an attachment to a dermatologist), synchronous (e.g., videoconferencing to discuss patient, X-ray or lab result).

Medspeak-UK
The use of interactive audiovisuals and data transfer to diagnose and treat disease, teach/educate and transfer medical information.

telemedicine

Informatics Any form of medical practice in which diagnostic information–eg, telecytology, telemetry, telemicroscopy, telepathology, or teleradiology, is transmitted from a distance to a physician for analysis, who performs teleconsultation; telemedicine focuses on provider aspects of healthcare telecommunications, especially medical imaging. See Telemetry.

tel·e·med·i·cine

(telĕ-medi-sin)
The practice of medicine over a distance where the patient and doctor interact remotely, usually using a computer and a computer-mounted camera.

telemedicine

Medical activity in which written, audible and visual communication between doctor and patient, or between medical personnel, is conducted at long range via a communication network such as the Internet or an intranet. This communication can include teleconferencing, teleconsultation, teleradiology, distance learning and the performing of surgical operations at a remote distance from the patient. Telemedicine broadens the scope of consultation and makes access to experts easier. It can effect considerable savings in medical costs. See also MEDICAL COMPUTING.
References in periodicals archive ?
As telemedicine gains momentum, more health providers are moving from stand-alone programs to system wide approaches.
Telemedicine seems to be a particularly hot topic of debate right now, with discussions on both sides of the Atlantic (The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK and Veterinary Information Network in the US have both recently surveyed veterinarians on this very issue).
"Parents are citing telemedicine because of convenience and that's true for other industries that have gone mobile," Dr.
According to a new research report, Global Telemedicine Market Outlook 2022, the market for telemedicine was valued at US$ 29.6 Billion in 2017 and is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of approximately 19% during 2017-2022.
There is, however, a "paradigm shift" occurring in workers' comp when it comes to telemedicine, according to Dr.
Telemedicine also provides a way to monitor chronic conditions, particularly for people who struggle to get to a doctor.
Telemedicine use for patient interactions ranged from 8% among practices with 1-4 doctors to 27% among those with at least 50 physicians.
"The problem is the providers know what they need to do for traditional in-person services, but they don't fully understand the complexities and nuances that can be implicated by telemedicine. [For instance], they know how to bill for an in-person E/M [evaluation and management] service, but they don't know to bill for it properly for when it's done virtually."
The state House Professional Licensure Committee sought testimony on a definition of telemedicine, ways to protect consumers and a requirement that insurers reimburse services delivered by telemedicine.
Spyridon Fortis, M.D., from the Iowa City VA Health Care System, and colleagues compared the effect of ICU telemedicine on inter-hospital transfers based upon data from 306 Veterans Affairs ICUs in 117 acute care facilities between 2011 and 2015.
Telemedicine allows individuals to use online resources to contact medical professionals to order prescriptions, ask questions, receive treatment advice, and schedule appointments.

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