tegmen tympani


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tegmen

 [teg´men] (L.)
a covering structure or roof.
tegmen tym´pani the thin layer of bone that forms the roof of the tympanic cavity, separating it from the cranial cavity.

teg·men tym·'pa·ni

[TA]
the roof of the middle ear, formed by the thin anterior surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Its anterior edge is inserted into the petrosquamous fissure so that it can be seen as a wedge of bone subdividing that fissure into a squamotympanic and a petrotympanic fissure.
Synonym(s): roof of tympanum

teg·men tym·pa·ni

(teg'men tim'pan-ī) [TA]
The roof of the middle ear, formed by the thinned anterior surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Its anterior edge is inserted into the petrosquamous fissure so that it can be seen as a wedge of bone subdividing that fissure into a squamotympanic and a petrotympanic fissure.

tegmen

pl. tegmina [L.] a covering structure or roof.

tegmen tympani
1. the thin layer of bone separating the tympanic antrum from the cranial cavity.
2. the roof of the tympanic cavity, related to part of the petrous portion of the temporal bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
CT low dense cholesteatomatous lesion also noted in right middle ear cavity, more in epitympanic space with erosion of right Tegmen tympani (Arrow in Image D) and intact right-sided scutum and ossicular chain.
Erosion of Tegmen tympani was also noted (White arrow in Image E).
Tegmen tympani and lateral semi-circular wall dehiscence were also visible (Fig.
Other CT findings include: erosions of scuta, destruction and displacement of the ossicular chain, labyrinthine fistulas, facial canal erosions, tegmen tympani dehiscence, and destruction of the mastoid.
A multi--layered closure technique in which autologous and artificial materials are combined is considered to result in the highest rate of success, the most common defect sites were located over the tegmen mastoideum and tegmen tympani.
The 1-cm defect in the tegmen tympani was located at the level of the lateral semicircular canal, and it extended to a level anterior to the head of the malleus.
Examination from below through the mastoidectomy revealed comminution of the tegmen tympani fracture with multiple subcentimeter openings in the bone in addition to the dominant bone defect.
Advances in neuroradiology, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have improved the diagnosis and management of lesions that erode the tegmen tympani.
The latter included (1) removal of all air cells at the level of the tegmen, sinodural angle, and mastoid tip, (2) canaloplasty, including removal of tegmental air cells to the level of the tegmen tympani and anteriorly to the temporomandibular joint, and (3) lowering of the facial ridge to the level of the facial nerve.
High-resolution axial and coronal computed tomography (CT) showed a mass of soft-tissue density in the middle ear and erosion of the tegmen tympani and middle fossa plates lateral to the lateral semicircular canal (figure 1).
We also found another positive aspect to the middle fossa approach; there was no need for a wide retraction of the temporal lobe to locate the tegmen tympani.
Holt and Gates advised exposing the dura to look for intracranial complications when tegmen tympani osteitis or granulation tissue is found during mastoidectomy.