teasel

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Related to teasels: Dipsacus, common teasel

teasel

Chinese medicine
A perennial plant, the root of which is analgesic, haemostatic and tonic; it is used for breast tumours, fractures, low back pain, menstrual disorders, postpartum bleeding, sports injuries, increased urinary frequency, and Raynaud phenomenon. 

Herbal medicine
Teasel was once used in Western herbal medicine as an anti-inflammatory, diaphoretic, diuretic and digestive tonic; it is rarely used by modern herbologists.
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Therefore, we hypothesized that aminopyralid would be more effective at killing teasel rosettes than glyphosate.
From April into the winter, teasels are a kind of filling station for the birds and the bees.
He describes teasels as a plant synonymous with Huddersfield and foxgloves as characteristic of our landscapes in June.
Teasels (Dipsacus fullonum) are favourites with finches, as are sunflowers, giant thistles, and many other plants that retain their seeds long into winter.
Purple loosestrife, valerian and teasels are great wildflower choices and ensure that you include a good mixture of herbaceous perennials, shrubs and trees in order to create diversity and also to help spread the food supplies over the whole year.
Avoid sterile hybrids, which won't produce seeds or fruit, but provide some colour and nutritious seeds for the birds by planting coneflowers, teasels and knautia macedonica.
They are also increasingly seen in gardens as more homeowners put out seed to encourage them, while wilder gardens have led to more thistles and teasels which provide seeds for finches, the charity said.
Many more self-sown cultivated flowers bloom at different seasons: Lychnis coronaria, cousin to the campion, with silver-green leaves and plum-red flowers, larkspur, columns of blue or white campulas, purple-haloed teasels, Sweet Williams, honesty, valerian and violets.
Outside the rain is falling on the beautifully-tended gardens where huge daisies and teasels in the colourful borders are as attractive to wildlife as they are to visitors.
Leaving seedheads, especially on plants such as teasels, thistles and sunflowers, and allowing vegetation to die back naturally, provides food and shelter for birds through the coldest months.
Add fruiting and berrying plants in quiet corners of the garden and provide plants with seed heads such as teasels and grasses.