teasel


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Related to teasel: common teasel

teasel

Chinese medicine
A perennial plant, the root of which is analgesic, haemostatic and tonic; it is used for breast tumours, fractures, low back pain, menstrual disorders, postpartum bleeding, sports injuries, increased urinary frequency, and Raynaud phenomenon. 

Herbal medicine
Teasel was once used in Western herbal medicine as an anti-inflammatory, diaphoretic, diuretic and digestive tonic; it is rarely used by modern herbologists.
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These common names begin to hint at why the teasel was once so widely cultivated in the south Midlands, especially along the Severn Valley, and why it still hangs around in little pockets even today.
Therefore, we hypothesized that aminopyralid would be more effective at killing teasel rosettes than glyphosate.
TEASELS were once cultivated for teasing fabrics, mainly wool, but nowadays these impressive seed heads - loved by butterflies, bees and birds such as goldfinches - are planted in wild areas of the garden.
Wild teasel came to North America from Europe early in our colonial history.
These contain the teasel seeds and goldfinches in particular go mad for them.
Teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris) is an herbaceous mono-carpic perennial found in old fields and disturbed areas in northeastern North America, where it was introduced from Europe in the late 19th century (Werner 1975a).
Clarins' Multi-Active Treatment Essence Vitality (pink) has teasel extract to boost skin vitality, and acerola seed extract to enhance skin radiance.
But the women were rewarded with the sight of two bright orange sulfur butterflies and a cluster of Western tiger swallowtail supping on teasel flowers.
Boys Acer, Ash and Hickory and females Teasel and Holly have gone to a new home at The Wild Place Project, Bristol Zoo's sister attraction.
H Hammerton, raising of roof height of house |and building of side dormer, 5 Teasel Close, Hightown, Dewsbury.
Last year, the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) launched a guide as part of its Perfect for Pollinators initiative, listing more than 200 wildflowers, such as corncockle, teasel and wild parsnip, that provide plentiful pollen and nectar for pollinating insects.