tea tree


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tea tree

n.
1. A melaleuca tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) of Australia whose leaves yield an oil used in cosmetics and for medicinal purposes.
2. Any of various evergreen shrubs or small trees of the genus Leptospermum, native to Southeast Asia and Australasia, having showy flowers and small needlelike leaves formerly used to make a tealike beverage.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tea tree oil makes the tick let go on its own, so the entire tick is gone.
Tea Tree also supports local authors with book signings, and holds events that feature local artists or artisans.
The bar is made from organic charcoal which draws out bacteria and excess oil, natural antiseptic tea tree oil which reduces inflammation, and shea butter to keep skin hydrated.
Tea-tree oil: Derived from the Australian Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), many shampoos now include this ingredient.
[USA], Mar 18 ( ANI ): Lavender and tea tree oils could be giving boys breasts, scientists have warned.
A nice change from the ordinary, this refreshing floss is coated with Australian tea tree oil and waxed with beeswax.
Results: Adulteration of a number of tea tree oil samples was demonstrated either by abnormal enantiomeric ratios and/or the presence of compounds that are not known to occur naturally in tea tree oil.
"There were fewer side effects in the tea tree oil group, with less people complaining about skin discomfort."
"Further study is warranted to observe the effects of tea tree oil with and without conventional antimicrobial pharmaceutical treatment for both 5.
Tea tree oil has anti-inflammatory and anti microbial properties (Caldefie-Chezet et al., 2004) with broad spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (Longbottom et al., 2004).
Gillian Bruce, CET author of Blephartis, but not as you know it, commented: "It is important to raise awareness of this less well known cause of blepharitis amongst practitioners and that treatment of cases can be undertaken by optometrists in practice." However, she stressed: "Treatment with tea tree oil is toxic to the cornea and should only be undertaken by experienced practitioners who are comfortable dealing with the potential side effects of toxic keratitis"