taxonomy


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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Rule 33-9002, foreign companies using IFRS were expected to submit their XBRL financial reports beginning in 2011; however, the IASB did not release its first IFRS taxonomy until 2014.
* Taxonomy Practitioner of the Year--for example, someone who's gone the extra mile to support their organisation with taxonomies, or someone who got landed with managing their organisation's taxonomy and got into it, or people who have contributed to the wider taxonomy practice, especially if they've done that in their own time or on their own initiative.
Anderson, a former student of Bloom, updated and revised the taxonomy, claiming its relevance to 21st century work for both students and teachers (Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001).
Patrick Lambe (founder of Straits Knowledge) began the second day's keynote by stressing the importance of having a stated desired outcome for design that could be used to guide taxonomy development.
For those just embarking on developing a subject-specific taxonomy, the cost for a single user of MultiTes Pro is well worth the investment ($295 plus $165/year maintenance).
So the question that you need to ask yourself is, "Does our site taxonomy provide a smooth, direct road leading our customers to their destination quickly, or does it resemble roads constantly under construction with roadblocks at every turn that eventually force our customers to get off the road and take an alternative route altogether?"
Knowledge can be assessed by straightforward means, for example, multiple choice or short-answer questions that require the retrieval or recognition of information, for example, "Name five sources of drug information." Health professionals must have command of vast amounts of knowledge such as protocols, interactions, and medical terminology that are committed to memory, but simple recall of facts does not provide evidence of comprehension, which is the next higher level in Bloom's taxonomy.
Bloom's taxonomy was taken as a reference for examining the alignment in evaluation of assessment practices and intended learning outcomes of the selected courses.
Keywords: Bloom's Taxonomy Sindh Textbook Board curriculum exercises
I found additional resources to complement the tool, including applications (apps) that correspond to Bloom's taxonomy. A great guide for apps (iPad, Android, Google, and Web 2.0) that correspond to various educational levels is online at www.schrockguide.net/bloomin-apps.html.
There are many examples of the global adoption of the IFRS XBRL taxonomy, but IFRS-based XBRL filings are mostly for tax and banking/insurance regulation reporting, not for statutory financial reporting of publicly listed companies as in the SEC's 2009 XBRL reporting mandate.