taxanes


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tax·anes

(taks'ānz),
A class of antitumor agents derived directly or semisynthetically from Taxus brevifolia, the Pacific yew; examples include paclitaxel and docetaxel.

taxanes

Oncology A family of antimitotic/antimicrotubule agents that inhibit cancer cell growth by stopping cell division
References in periodicals archive ?
Secondly, the preclinical program expansion indication of PledOx in cellgiftsinducerad peripheral neuropathy (Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy, CIPN) caused by taxanes. Third, activities required for PledOx market application within oxaliplatin-induced CIPN.
Many classical anti-cancer drugs act on the spindle microtubules: The taxanes originally obtained from the yew, for example, prevent the degradation of the microtubules and thus stabilize the mitotic spindle.
QoL was assessed at six timepoints: at baseline, after administration of one and four cycles of taxanes, before administration of FE100C, and after one and four cycles of FE100C.
Methods: We included 30 patients who received at least 6 cycles of taxane regimen for metastatic mPC in the present study.
While no new safety concerns were identified, differences in toxicity profiles among the taxanes were noted.
It is an orally available tubulin targeting agent that has demonstrated efficacy in preclinical studies against hormone sensitive, castration resistant, as well as taxane resistant prostate cancer.
The taxanes and vinca alkaloids target that part of the cytoskeleton known as microtubules.
Unlike standard taxanes that must be administered intravenously, tesetaxel is a capsule that is taken by mouth.
These drugs include vinca alkaloids, platinum-based drugs such as cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin, and the taxanes docetaxel and paclitaxel.
The validity of neuropathy and neuropathic pain measures in patients with cancer receiving taxanes and platinums.
Although mitosis-inhibiting drugs are used successfully to treat a range of cancers, only about 50 percent of ovarian cancer patients respond to taxanes and it is not yet possible to identify in advance which patients will benefit.
Neratinib (HKI-272) is a potent, low-molecular-weight, orally administered, irreversible, pan-ErbB (i.e., Erb 1,2, and 4) receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitor which has been successfully evaluated in Phase I studies involving HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with trastuzumab, anthracyclines and taxanes.