tautonym


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

tautonym

(tô′tə-nĭm′)
n.
A taxonomic designation, such as Gorilla gorilla, in which the genus and species names are the same, commonly used in zoology but no longer in botany.

tau·ton′y·mous (tô-tŏn′ə-məs) adj.
tau·ton′y·my n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tautonym

the same scientific name applied to both genus and species (or sub-species).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the standard definition of numerical tautonym it should therefore come as no surprise that the articles that have appeared in Word Ways on this topic have limited their investigation to words whose total number of letters can be evenly divided by the number of parts in that word.
In the penultimate article referred to above Darryl Francis also presents a small number of numerical tautonyms with three, four or five parts (in which each part consists of either two or three letters).
Hence, for example, no Scrabble Palindromes were found with the patterns 23.32 and 32.23 of Scrabble Tautonyms with the patterns 23.23 and 32.32.
This is wrong and, in the February 2015 issue, I pointed out that these examples are phonetic tautonyms according to the phonetics of the Oxford English Dictionary.
Returning to uncapitalised homophonic tautonyms, the English Dialect Dictionary (EDD) includes DEEDY (industrious), PEEPY (drowsy) and TEATY (peevish), while Chambers Dictionary has (screaming) MEEMIE, a hysterical person, and Webster's 3rd has EASIES, stops rowing.
They are correct, being phonetic tautonyms according to the Oxford English Dictionary's phonetics.
Numerical Tautonyms such as GULP (G + U = 28 and L + P also = 28) have appeared in previous issues of Word Ways.
However, I'm not familiar with any dialect that would pronounce Susan's several-y ending words (lily etc) as tautonyms. To my mixed US-Australian ear, they all combine a short i with a long e sound.
These are only obtainable from words which are themselves tautonyms, so are not included here.
Also omitted are tautonyms such as POCKETA-POCKETA (an engine sound, OED), where the two halves are identical.
DARRYL FRANCIS comments on Susan Thorpe's Scrabble Patterns: "'Her article omits the 4.4 two-letter word FY (in the Scrabble palindromes and Scrabble tautonyms section).
For obvious reasons, I ignored words and terms which are simply tautonyms (ie where the first and second halves are identical--for example, CHIMACHIMA).